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Watch: Young Tunisians 'Happy,' Dance To Pharrell

BIZERTE — Tunisia’s youth are posting videos on social networks of themselves dancing to Pharrell William’s song “Happy” as a kind of gleeful response to post-Arab spring tensions that the country still faces.

The first video appeared in early January, and was approaching 200,000 views on YouTube. "We're happy in spite of everything," said Fairouz, who supervised the original video from Bizerte.

"Citizens were disappointed after the revolution because of the uncertain landscape and vague future, especially young people, who believe that nothing has changed in their condition," 45-year-old teacher Mohamed Naceri told Magharebia. "This is one form of self-expression and an outlet so they don't explode. I personally prefer this to extremism and terrorism.”

Still, there was hope last month with the approval of a new constitution that includes several articles that guarantee the freedom of opinion, belief, expression and conscience.

Still, some religious groups were not pleased with these public expressions of glee to an American pop song, deeming it “debauchery and moral decay that can't continue.”

The videos were not restricted to Bizerte, as others quickly emerged from many Tunisian cities. Here’s the equally joyful edition from Tunis — we dare you not to be happy after watching it.

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Economy

Abenomics Revisited: Why Japan Hasn't Attacked The Wealth Divide

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida promised to tackle wealth inequality and help struggling workers. But a year after he came to power, financial traders are once again the winners.

Japanese workers will still have to wait for the distribution of wealth promised by Prime Minister Fumio Kishida.

Yann Rousseau

-Analysis-

TOKYO — Panic on the Nikkei, the Japanese stock market. Almost a year ago, at the end of September 2021, traders went into a panic in Tokyo. On Sept. 29, Fumio Kishida had just won the general election for the country's main conservative party, the Liberal Democratic Party. He was about to be named Prime Minister, succeeding Yoshide Suga, who'd grown too unpopular in the polls.

Kishida had won through a rather original reform program, which was in stark contrast with years of conservative pro-market politics. In his speeches, he had promised to generate a “new capitalism”. A phrase that makes investors shudder.

While he did not completely renounce his predecessors’ strategy called “Abenomics” — named after free-market stalwart Shinzo Abe, who was killed last July — Kishida declared that the government needed to tackle the issue of the redistribution of wealth in the island nation.

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