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Watch: Young Tunisians 'Happy,' Dance To Pharrell

Watch: Young Tunisians 'Happy,' Dance To Pharrell

BIZERTE — Tunisia’s youth are posting videos on social networks of themselves dancing to Pharrell William’s song “Happy” as a kind of gleeful response to post-Arab spring tensions that the country still faces.

The first video appeared in early January, and was approaching 200,000 views on YouTube. "We're happy in spite of everything," said Fairouz, who supervised the original video from Bizerte.

"Citizens were disappointed after the revolution because of the uncertain landscape and vague future, especially young people, who believe that nothing has changed in their condition," 45-year-old teacher Mohamed Naceri told Magharebia. "This is one form of self-expression and an outlet so they don't explode. I personally prefer this to extremism and terrorism.”

Still, there was hope last month with the approval of a new constitution that includes several articles that guarantee the freedom of opinion, belief, expression and conscience.

Still, some religious groups were not pleased with these public expressions of glee to an American pop song, deeming it “debauchery and moral decay that can't continue.”

The videos were not restricted to Bizerte, as others quickly emerged from many Tunisian cities. Here’s the equally joyful edition from Tunis — we dare you not to be happy after watching it.

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Indigenous Women Of Ecuador Set Example For Sustainable Agriculture

In southern Ecuador, a women-led agricultural program offers valuable lessons on sustainable farming methods, but also how to end violence.

Photo of women walking in Ecuador

Women walking in Guangaje Ecuador

Camila Albuja

SARAGURO — Here in this corner of southern Ecuador, life seems to be like a mandala — everything is cleverly used in this ancestral system of circular production. But the women of Saraguro had to fight and resist to make their way of life, protecting the local water and the seeds. When weaving, the women share and take care of each other, also weaving a sense of community.

With the wrinkled tips of her fingers, Mercedes Quizhpe, an indigenous woman from the Kichwa Saraguro people, washes one by one the freshly harvested vegetables from her garden. Standing on a small bench, with her hands plunged into the strong torrent of icy water and the bone-chilling early morning breeze, she checks that each one of her vegetables is ready for fair day. Her actions hold a life of historical resistance, one that prioritizes the care of life through the defense of territory and food sovereignty.

Mercedes' way of life is also one that holds many potential lessons for how to do agriculture and tourism better.

In the province of Loja, work begins before sunrise. At 5:00 a.m., the barking of dogs, the guardians of each house, starts. There is that characteristic smell of damp earth from the morning dew. Sheep bah uninterruptedly through the day. With all this life around, the crowing of early-rising roosters doesn't sound so lonely.

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