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Germany

Verdun, 100 Years Later: Merkel And Hollande Remember

On the front page of its Monday edition, Düsseldorf-based daily Rheinische Post ran a solemn picture of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande standing side by side at a cemetery in northeastern France, to mark "100 years after" the World War I Battle of Verdun.

The Battle of Verdun was one of the longest battles of the The Great War. An estimated 800,000 soldiers died in northeastern France, during a carnage that lasted from February to December 1916.

During the weekend ceremonies marking the centenary, both leaders called for European unity by heeding lessons from the past, with Hollande saying that it would "take infinitely less time to destroy Europe than it did to build it," and Merkel warning that "War is possible ... We must remain vigilant to avoid it."

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eyes on the U.S.

Eyes On U.S. — California, The World Is Worried About You

As an Italian bestseller explores why people are fleeing the Golden State, the international press also takes stock of unprecedented Silicon Valley layoffs. It may be a warning for the rest of the world.

Photo of a window pane with water droplets reflecting Facebook's thumb up logo, with one big thumb down in the background

Are you OK, Meta?

Ginevra Falciani and Bertrand Hauger

-Analysis-

For as long as we can remember, the world has seen California as the embodiment of the American Dream.

Today, this dream may be fading — and the world is taking notice.

A peek at the Italian list of non-fiction best-sellers in 2022 includes California by Francesco Costa, a book that looks to explain why 340,000 people moved out of the state last year, causing a drop in its population for the first time ever.

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Why are all these people leaving a state that on paper looks like the best place in the world to live? Why are stickers with the phrase “Don't California my Texas” attached to the back of so many pick-up trucks?

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