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Two Killed In Suicide Bombing In Central Turkey

A suicide bomb squad killed two policemen and wounded more than a dozen people during an attack on a police station in central Turkey.

(AFP) ISTANBUL - Three men sped their vehicle into a police station in the city of Kayseri, where they fired weapons before one of the attackers set off a bomb, reports said.

One officer was killed instantly and another died on the way to hospital.

The attackers were also killed, news reports said.

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Society

In Mexico, Influencers Make Castoff Clothing Cool

Young consumers around the world increasingly seek out secondhand and alternative clothing markets — making Mexico City’s flea markets, or tianguis, suddenly and surprisingly popular.

In Mexico, Influencers Make Castoff Clothing Cool

Moisés Molina, 21, sifts through garments for sale at a stall at tianguis de Las Torres, ineastern Mexico City

Aline Suárez del Real Islas and Mar García

MEXICO CITY — The shouts of vendors mingle at the hodgepodge of stalls selling food, fruit and household items at the tianguis Las Torres, a flea market in eastern Mexico City. Beneath the tents, heaps of clothing are mounded on containers, planks and tubes. People examine garment after garment, holding them up to judge their size and draping their choices over their forearms and shoulders. The vendors watch from above, yelling prices and watching for occasional theft.

Bale clothing, or secondhand clothes, often called “ropa americana” (American clothing) here, is widely available at stalls in the open-air markets, or tianguis, of Mexico City and the State of Mexico. These garments, often illegally smuggled from the United States, used to be an affordable apparel option for Mexican families.

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