When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

SPOTLIGHT: TRUMP AND THE ‘SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP'

It was 1946 when Winston Churchill coined the term "special relationship" to describe the uniquely close ties between the U.S. and UK: diplomatic, military, cultural, linguistic, economic… and yes, historic. The transatlantic amity dates back to the mid-19th century, when the two countries — one the world's dominant empire, the other an ambitious former colony destined to be an empire of its own — began to find it both natural and convenient to work together. It says something about the fluidity of geopolitics that this particularly close partnership could take form just decades after the two countries fought a pair of bloody wars.


Could it all be reversed even more quickly with the prospect of a Donald Trump presidency? After the presumptive Republican nominee took direct slaps at both British Prime Minister David Cameron and newly elected London Mayor Sadiq Khan in an ITV interview Monday, British political commentator John McTernan suggested in The Telegraph that the threat to the British-American relations would be very real indeed with Trump in the White House. And it goes beyond any personal animosity between the Republican frontrunner and Cameron. "There is no conceivable British prime minister who would be able to fake respect for Trump's intellect and strategic insight. It is, fundamentally, what a Trump victory would mean: a triumph for nativism and isolationism. The strategic response would be for Britain to pivot to Europe and the new defence axis would be the one that has always, in a way, made more sense: integration with France," McTernan writes.


No doubt global coverage in the coming months will include a region-by-region, country-by-country look at what a Trump presidency would mean for the rest of the world. His campaign, as Dominique Moisi noted last week in French daily Les Echos, is the first major challenge to Washington's internationalist policy in the past 75 years. It is just one part of what makes Trump's candidacy so, well… special.


DOZENS KILLED IN BAGHDAD BOMBINGS

Two bombings in the Iraqi capital, including a suicide attack in a crowded market, have killed at least 44 people. Reuters says that initial reports indicate a woman suicide bomber carried out the market attack in a Shia neighborhood in northern Baghdad.

Keep reading... Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!

"Er ..."

YouTube screenshot

May 21-22

  • A liberated Ukrainian village
  • Long COVID limbo
  • TikToker under fire
  • … and much more.
Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ