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A Thai psychedelic band called Khun Narin Electric Phin Band is set to release its first album Aug. 26, on Innovative Leisure records. But who are the people behind this obscure name?

Not much is actually known about the musicians apart from what's told on the band's record cover. And this story is a special one, one of those Sugar Man-like adventures with people traveling across the world to find a rare pearl, or because they'd heard of some kind of legend.

It all started with this YouTube video, which Los Angeles music producer Josh Marcy stumbled upon on Dangerous Minds:

The producer watched clip after clip of these men playing in Thai villages or in the streets around a DIY-looking PA system that boosted 12-minute solos of a psyched-up, phazed, distorted and reverbing Phin. Until he came upon this insane video:

It was after seeing this parade of the century, which includes a cover of The Cranberries "Zombie," that Josh Marcy decided he had to produce them. And he did. After eventually finding them on Facebook and contacting them with the help of "interpretors" at a local Thai restaurant, he convinced them that they needed to spread their sound for the sake of music.

He flew to Thailand, and discovered that the band's members were always in rotation, at times including high school kids and 60-year-old men. Their usual ritual consisted of rehearsing at a home around noon, with beer and whiskey, before parading through the community toward the local temple and being joined by fans along the way.

Listen to the band's playlist for more crazy Thai psychedelia:

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2022 Kharkiv Pride Parade

Laura Valentina Cortés Sierra, Sophia Constantino and Lila Paulou

Welcome to Worldcrunch’s LGBTQ+ International. We bring you up-to-speed each week on a topic you may follow closely at home, but can now see from different places and perspectives around the world. Discover the latest news on everything LGBTQ+ — from all corners of the planet. All in one smooth scroll!

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