Utrinski Vesnik, March 1, 2016

"Tear gas and stones at the border near Gevgelija," writes Skopje-based daily Utrinski Vesnik on its Tuesday front page, a day after refugees clashed with police at the Greek-Macedonian border.

On Monday, Macedonian police fired tear gas at a crowd of migrants, some of whom were reportedly throwing stones at the police while storming a border fence, according to BBC.

Tensions have been mounting along the so-called "Balkan route," and especially around the Greece-Macedonia border, a key crossing for asylum seekers fleeing war in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan in the hope of reaching Germany.

An estimated 6,500 Middle Eastern refugees are reportedly living in camps in the area.

Europe is facing an unprecedented humanitarian crisis, with migrant-related clashes also sparking in northern France, where French police are due to continue dismantling makeshift shelters on the outskirts of Calais, home to anywhere between 3,700 and 5,500 migrants trying to reach the UK.

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Green

Inside Sweden's "100,000-Year" Solution To Bury Nuclear Waste

As experts debate whether nuclear power can become another leading renewable energy source, Sweden has adopted a first-of-its-kind underground depository for nuclear waste — and many countries are following their lead.

At Sweden's Oskarshamn nuclear power plant

Carl-Johan Karlsson

As last fall’s climate summit in Glasgow made it clear that the world is still on route for major planetary disaster, it also brought the question of nuclear power squarely back on the agenda. A growing number of experts and policymakers now argue that nuclear energy deserves many of the same considerations as wind, solar and other leading renewables.

But while staunch opponents to nuclear may be slowly shifting their opinion, and countries like France, the UK and especially China plan to expand their nuclear portfolios, one main question keeps haunting policymakers: how do we store the radioactive waste?

In Sweden, the government claims to have found a solution.

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