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SPOTLIGHT: FRENCH CONSOLATION

France needed this win badly. It has been a grim 18 months, with major terrorist attacks, a crippled economy and record floods, and the country yearned for the kind of unifying victory that sports can provide. And so an edgy kind of optimism reigned ahead of kickoff at the European Soccer Championship final — at the same Stade de France venue that was among the ISIS targets last Nov. 13 when three terrorists triggered suicide vests during a friendly game against Germany.


But victory on the pitch was not to be last night. Portugal beat host country France 1-0, claiming its first ever European soccer title with an overtime goal, even after star Portuguese striker Cristiano Ronaldo was forced out early with an injury.


Still, there is consolation and counsel in defeat. Although clashes outside the stadium and near the Eiffel Tower marred the victory for the large community of French citizens of Portuguese descent, the championship as a whole was not marked by death, rampant violence or terror attacks. Indeed, sporting competition has long been a way for neighboring families, towns and nations to openly express pride and identity that is hard-fought but not life-or-death. For a taste of true fraternité, check out this heartwarming video of a tearful French supporter being consoled by a young Portuguese fan.



WHAT TO LOOK FOR TODAY

  • Dallas administrative buildings reopen, while other parts still shut off as part of an active shooting scene.
  • Naadam festival opens in Mongolia. The traditional games involve Mongolian wrestling, horse racing, and archery.
  • The Republican Party Platform Committee's meetings kick off, ahead of upcoming convention in Cleveland.


N. KOREA THREATS OVER MISSILE SYSTEM

In a statement published today on Pyongyang's official news agency KCNA, North Korea has threatened to "take a physical counter-action" after the U.S. and South Korea announced the deployment of their joint Terminal High Altitude Area Defense system (THAAD), designed to keep Kim Jong-un in check.


AUSTRALIA'S TURNBULL CLAIMS VICTORY

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull claimed victory of the country's extremely tight federal election, whose final result comes out more than a week after voting took place, The Sydney Morning Herald reports.


— ON THIS DAY

From Bobby Fischer to Yul Brynner, here's your 57-second shot of History!


UNCONTESTED THERESA MAY

Andrea Leadsom has pulled out of the Conservative party race, paving the way for Home Secretary Theresa May to replace David Cameron as British prime minister. According to The Guardian's live blog, the passing of the baton could happen by the end of the week — if not sooner.


CLASHES IN SOUTH SUDAN

Renewed clashes between soldiers loyal to South Sudan's President Salva Kiir and Vice-President Riek Machar erupted in Juba yesterday. According to the BBC, more than 200 people have died from gunfire and explosions in the area since Friday, when the violence began after Machar and Kiir met, rekindling fears of instability in the region in spite of a peace deal signed last year.


ABE TO FOCUS ON ECONOMY AFTER VICTORY

In Japan, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Liberal Democratic Party with its partner, the Komeito Party, has won 70 out of the 121 seats up for election in a 242-seat upper house. With a two-thirds majority now, Abe is expected to pass economic reform, including a stimulus package, and constitutional revisions, according to The Japan News. This was the first election since the lowering of the voting age from 20 to 18, allowing 2.4 million youths into the electorate.


— WORLDCRUNCH-TO-GO

The Swiss Amish in the United States are keeping alive a vocal art passed down from their ancestors in Switzerland and eastern France. Both a symbol of identity and entertainment, yodeling was also a source of inspiration for American country music. For Swiss daily Le Temps (Switzerland being itself quite familiar with yodeling), Xavier Filliez went to Indiana to meet some of them: "Hilty learned how to yodel when he was little, alongside his brothers and sisters, by listening to their older siblings. The Amish usually yodel amongst themselves, away from the curious glances of foreigners. ‘You can't really learn how to yodel,' he explains. ‘You listen and try to reproduce what you've heard.' ... ‘You know, I'm 69,' he says. ‘I've survived one heart attack. I don't practice yodeling very often now, though I try to teach it to my two grandchildren.'"

Read the full article, In American Heartland, Swiss Amish Carry On Yodeling Tradition.


VENEZUELANS CROSS INTO COLOMBIA FOR SUPPLIES

The economic and food crisis in Venezuela prompted some 500 Venezuelan women to break through border controls into Colombia over the past week. In response, Venezuela opened their common border for 12 hours on Sunday. This allowed 35,000 people access to food and medicine in Colombia, according to Colombian officials.


MY GRAND-PERE'S WORLD

Waiting For The Rice To Dry — Bandung, 1991


KASHMIR VIOLENCE

A strict curfew was imposed today in the Indian region of Kashmir, after at least 17 people, including a police officer, were killed and hundreds injured in weekend clashes between protesters and Indian police, the Times of India reports.


SUPER TYPHOON STILL KILLS IN CHINA

Super typhoon Nepartak swept through southeastern China this weekend causing over 900 million yuan ($134.6 million) in damages. Nine people have been killed and 18 are still missing. According to Xinhua News, 3,600 homes were destroyed and 34,324 residents were evacuated. Another 1,000 people were trapped under the rubble. Rescue and relief efforts are still ongoing.


— MORE STORIES, BROUGHT TO YOU BY WORLDCRUNCH

RED HOT METALLICA

Rockers have had plenty of run-ins over the years at airport customs offices around the world. But when the Red Hot Chili Peppers were summoned by customs police in Belarus, it was just a friendly request for autographs. Just one problem, reports Chili Peppers bassist Flea: "They asked us to sign a bunch of Metallica cd's and photos," Flea wrote on Instagram next to a photo of him signing pictures of Metallica. Read more from Rolling Stone magazine.

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Geopolitics

Why The 'Perfect Storm' Of Iran's Protests May Be Unstoppable

The latest round of anti-regime protests in Iran is different than other in the 40 years of the Islamic Republic: for its universality and boldness, the level of public fury and grief, and the role of women and social media. The target is not some policy or the economy, but the regime itself.

A woman holds a lock of her hair during a London rally to protest the murder of Mahsa Amini in London

Roshanak Astaraki

-Analysis-

The death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in Tehran on Sept. 16, after a possible beating at a police station, has sparked outrage and mass protests in Iran and abroad. There have been demonstrations and a violent attempt to suppress them in more than 100 districts in every province of Iran.

These protests may look like others since 2017, and back even to 1999 — yet we may be facing an unprecedented turning point in Iranians' opposition to the Islamic Republic. Indeed newly installed conservative President Ibrahim Raisi could not have expected such momentum when he set off for a quick trip to New York and back for a meeting of the UN General Assembly.

For one of the mistakes of a regime that takes pride in dismissing the national traditions of Iran is to have overlooked the power of grief among our people.

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