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Snow Reaches Desert's Edge In Iran

Snow Reaches Desert's Edge In Iran

While northern Iran has been hit by record snowfall in recent days, snow has also covered for the first time in living memory, the district of Shahdad in southeastern Iran, which typically has desert conditions and scorching temperatures.

The head of the Shahdad district, Mohammad Mo'meni, told Iran's Mehr news agency snow began to fall Tuesday, continuing into the next day, with an approximate accumulation of four centimeters.

"I spoke to people here and the oldest among them who is 80 said he had never seen snow," said Mo'meni.

The Jomhuri-e Eslami newspaper reported Thursday that six "foreign travellers" had to be rescued after they were stuck in the snow at the edge of the Lut desert, in what the daily described as "close to the hottest place on earth."

Here's how the area looks from a satelite image (Wikipedia)

[rebelmouse-image 27087786 alt="""" original_size="800x530" expand=1]

Meanwhile in northern Iran, snowfalls around the city of Mazandaran (photo above isasma via instagram) totaled some two meters, more than has been seen in 50 years.

@HassanRouhani sends ministers to provinces slammed by snow #Iran#Rouhanihttp://t.co/9UmaPbRfvWpic.twitter.com/BM8iHpQiM0

— Iran (@Iran) February 6, 2014

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NFTs Are Not Dead — They May Be Coming Soon To A Theater Near You

Despite turbulence in the crypto market, NFT advocates think the digital objects could revolutionize how films and television series are financed and produced.

NFTs Are Not Dead — They May Be Coming Soon To A Theater Near You

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NFT converts say that digital objects could profoundly change the link between the general public and creators of cinematic content by revolutionizing the way animated films and TV series are financed. Even if, by their own admission, none of the experiments currently underway have so far amounted to much.

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