blog

Smart Cities International: Tangier Cameras, China Pollution Drones, Buenos Aires Biking

Here is a preview of our exclusive newsletter to keep up-to-date and stay inspired by Smart City innovations from around the world.

Biking in Buenos Aires
Biking in Buenos Aires
Emily Liedel

[rebelmouse-image 27088692 alt="""" original_size="600x399" expand=1]

For those of us who don’t live in polluted cities, it’s easy to take the air we breathe for granted. And for municipal officials this much should be clear: Just like it is a city’s job to provide residents with clean water and reliable electricity, it is the city’s responsibility to ensure the air is safe to breathe.


Clean air comes in many forms. This past week, Beijing enacted a ban on smoking indoors, bringing it in line with norms in Europe and the United States. Of course, smokers aren’t the only ones making Beijing’s air unbreathable; and this week, in addition to other smart city news, we’re taking a look at a novel way that Chinese authorities are enforcing pollution controls around the country. We’ll also visit the pollution question elsewhere — for although China often gets the most attention for its pollution, it is far from the worst offender.


— Emily Liedel

[rebelmouse-image 27089097 alt="""" original_size="627x305" expand=1]

THE SMART CITY THAT BRINGS US CLOSER TO OUR FOOD

The Future Food District, a pavilion at the Milan Expo, presents a new kind of digitalized grocery store that would bring consumers more information about their food choices, La Tribune reports (French). The pavilion is set up like a supermarket, but when customers pick up an item, they see information on an overhead screen about where it came from, its nutritional content and its environmental impact. The designers say this kind of "smart food" information could help reconnect cities with the surrounding countryside, and encourage consumers to buy local products.

VERBATIM

“Planning law has a poor record in Africa. Legislation designed to protect the public from the negative aspects of urban land development has all too often been used by the state to enhance the value of land owned by the wealthy, and to penalize and intimidate the disadvantaged.”

Stephen Berrisford, an adjunct associate professor at the African Centre for Cities at the University of Cape Town, writes for the Africa Research Institute. Berrisford argues that African cities need new, effective urban planning laws that are applied equally to rich and poor if the continent’s cities have any hope of developing in a manageable way.

CO-CREATING THE FUTURE

In an effort to apply collective creativity to the development of a smarter city, the southern French city of Marseille hosted a day-long workshop to develop creative ideas about the city of the future, Urbannews reports (French). One of the workshop’s clear outcomes was establishing the many different visions that Marseille’s residents have of what a smart city should be — with many agreeing it should not be defined in a strictly technological sense.

SMART CITY SANTIAGO

Chile is building its first prototype smart city in Santiago’s Business Park.Smartcity Santiago will have integrated electrical grid that can be managed remotely, an automated network of renewable energy and a way to schedule tasks, like turning off the lights in an empty room, eSmart City reports (Spanish). The new city will also have both public transport and private vehicles that are 100% electric.<

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

The New Iraq, Signs Of Hope Amid The Rubble And Reconstruction

How do you rebuild a country decimated by four decades of war and embargoes? Following the withdrawal of the U.S. military, Iraq faces many challenges, from oil revenues captured by the militias and endemic corruption to religious segregation. However, there are glimmers of hope for the country's future.

Street scene in Erbil, Iraq

Théophile Simon

BAGHDAD — With a vast office located at the top of a tower fiercely guarded by the army and a bell to call the staff, Khalid Hamza Abbas is obviously a powerful character, decked out in an impeccable suit. Abbas runs the Basra Oil Company (BOC), the national company responsible for the exploitation of the oil fields in the province of Basra, in the very south of Iraq, from which four million barrels of crude oil flow daily. It’s the equivalent of 4% of world demand and 65% of central government revenue concentrated in a region of only four million inhabitants.

As he explains the profit-sharing scheme between the world’s major oil companies and his public enterprise, the 50-year-old with thin glasses is suddenly stopped dead in his tracks by the ringing of his telephone. He tries a joke to mask his suddenly worried face: "I'm going to ask you to leave my office for a few moments. If I haven't called you back in 10 minutes, call the police."

Keep reading... Show less
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ