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Building Cuzco's new Sheraton hotel
Building Cuzco's new Sheraton hotel

LIMA — The Sheraton hotel chain is being accused of threatening Peru's cultural patrimony by building a new hotel in protected parts of Cuzco, the ancient capital of the Inca empire and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Accusing Sheraton of violating the conditions of an earlier municipal permit, Peru's culture ministry has decided to appeal a local court ruling on July 18 that construction could continue on the hotel, Lima-based El Comercio reported.

Those conditions stipulated that modern buildings in the historical district should not exceed two floors and must include an open space amounting to 30% of the plot, Cuzco mayor Carlos Moscoso told the daily.

Meanwhile, China's Xinhua news agency cited the local cultural heritage chief, Daniel Maravi, as saying that the hotel that Sheraton was building with local contractors clashed with the traditional surroundings, adding that some parts even sat atop ancient Inca pathways.

He said the building could threaten Cuzco's status as a Heritage site. City prosecutors and UNESCO, which can remove damaged sites from its Heritage list, were expected to send teams at the site to assess the situation.

Cuzco is Peru's second leading tourist destination, after the citadel of Machu Picchu, and is expecting around 300,000 visitors for the long weekend beginning on 28 July, the daily Perú 21 reports.

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Geopolitics

New Probe Finds Pro-Bolsonaro Fake News Dominated Social Media Through Campaign

Ahead of Brazil's national elections Sunday, the most interacted-with posts on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Telegram and WhatsApp contradict trustworthy information about the public’s voting intentions.

Jair Bolsonaro bogus claims perform well online

Cris Faga/ZUMA
Laura Scofield and Matheus Santino

SÂO PAULO — If you only got your news from social media, you might be mistaken for thinking that Jair Bolsonaro is leading the polls for Brazil’s upcoming presidential elections, which will take place this Sunday. Such a view flies in the face of what most of the polling institutes registered with the Superior Electoral Court indicate.

An exclusive investigation by the Brazilian investigative journalism agency Agência Pública has revealed how the most interacted-with and shared posts in Brazil on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Telegram and WhatsApp share data and polls that suggest victory is certain for the incumbent Bolsonaro, as well as propagating conspiracy theories based on false allegations that research institutes carrying out polling have been bribed by Bolsonaro’s main rival, former president Luís Inácio Lula da Silva, or by his party, the Workers’ Party.

Agência Pública’s reporters analyzed the most-shared posts containing the phrase “pesquisa eleitoral” [electoral polls] in the period between the official start of the campaigning period, on August 16, to September 6. The analysis revealed that the most interacted-with and shared posts on social media spread false information or predicted victory for Jair Bolsonaro.

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