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Russians Hack DNC, French Violence, Hot Damn

SPOTLIGHT: PALESTINIAN PRISON LETTER

"My release is bound to happen, sooner or later ... "

The most charismatic living Palestinian leader Marwan Barghouti, who has been in an Israeli prison since 2002, offered a rare written exchange recently with Le Monde. Some see the 56-year-old, who was sentenced to five life imprisonments in 2004 for directing suicide bombings during the second Intifada, as the only figure who can unite the Palestinians — and then, the thinking follows, forge peace with Israel. A sort of "Mandela of the Middle East" is the dreamy hope: A Hebrew-speaking visionary with street cred in Gaza could not only bring an end to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but could in turn reverse the spiral of violence across the entire Arab world, and make those in the West safer in the process.


Middle East dreamers, however, are a vanishing breed. Not only are heels dug in deep in both Jerusalem and Ramallah, but few still hold onto the illusion that the conflicts burning within the Muslim world can be tamed in one fell swoop by the achievement of Palestinian statehood. That, of course, is no reason not to seek it more urgently than ever.

Check out the English edition of the Le Monde story, Marwan Barghouti, A Palestinian Mandela Or Israel's Worst Nightmare?



WHAT TO LOOK FOR TODAY



RUSSIAN HACKERS

Two groups of Russian hackers working for government intelligence agencies managed to gain access to the Democratic National Committee network for about a year, before being kicked out earlier this month. According to The Washington Post, the intruders targeted emails and files about presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.


ORLANDO SHOOTER'S WIFE COULD BE CHARGED

The wife of Omar Mateen, the terrorist who killed 49 people at an Orlando gay club, is believed to have had knowledge of her husband's plans and she could soon be charged, CNN reports. The couple has been married since 2011 and have a three-year-old son.


— ON THIS DAY

Twenty-two years ago on this day, we were introduced to "Hakuna matata." That, and more, in today's 57-second shot of History.


VERBATIM

"More innocents will die," French Prime Minister Manuel Valls told radio station France Inter this morning in reaction to the killing of married police department employees at their home on Monday night by an Islamist terrorist. The fight against terrorism in France could last "at least 10 or 20 years," he added.


FRENCH PROTESTS TURN VIOLENT, AGAIN

At least 40 people were wounded, including 29 police officers, during a new day of protests against a labor reform in France yesterday, France 24 reports. A small group of protesters attacked a children's hospital in Paris, smashing some of its windows. The three-year-old child of the couple killed on Monday night was there.


MORE HOOLIGAN CLASHES IN LILLE

France's northern city of Lille is in a "state of siege," daily Libération writes to describe the measures taken there to avoid the fights between Russian and English hooligans witnessed in Marseille days ago. But fights nonetheless started yesterday between groups of supporters. Russia is playing against Slovakia later today, while England and Wales will face each other tomorrow in the nearby city of Lens.


MY GRAND-PERE'S WORLD

Cameo Car — Monastir, 1970


1,500 YEARS

Alien life is out there, but we might not make contact with it until 1,500 years from now, two scientists believe.


ALLIGATOR DRAGS CHILD INTO LAKE AT DISNEY WORLD

A search and rescue operation is underway at Disney World in Orlando after an alligator dragged a two-year-old boy into the water, despite his father's efforts to protect him. Read more from the Orlando Sentinel.


— MORE STORIES, EXCLUSIVELY IN ENGLISH BY WORLDCRUNCH

NO MORE PIPING HOT DRINKS

It's not what you drink, but rather how hot it is, that can cause cancer, according to a new report by the UN's International Agency for Research on Cancer.

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Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

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