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As the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge spent their first night at home with their newborn son, the Internet celebrated the royal baby's birth in its own way.

Twitter trolls had a blast:

He's not ginger ;) #itsaboy

— Prince Harry (@Prince___Harry) July 22, 2013

Dear William & Kate: If William is 100% royal and Princess Kate is 0% royal, will that make your son a half-blood prince? #RoyalBaby

— Professor Snape (@_Snape_) July 22, 2013

Enjoy these first carefree moments, #royalbaby boy, because tomorrow begins THE GAME OF THRONES.

— Team Coco (@TeamCoco) July 22, 2013

Great to hear the Duchess of Cambridge has gone into labour. Is she an affiliated member? #boomtish#royalbaby

— John Prescott (@johnprescott) July 22, 2013

BBC pointing out the #RoyalBaby has been born on a full moon. Not sure if they're suggesting it's a werewolf. We may not know for a while.

— The Media Blog (@TheMediaTweets) July 22, 2013

Woah people seem super excited for this new british band, the royal baby.

— Ellen Page (@EllenPage) July 22, 2013

I hope that one day the royal baby and Blue Ivy will rap together about how rich they are.

— pourmecoffee (@pourmecoffee) July 22, 2013

If the #RoyalBaby ever sings "I just can't wait to be king" I will not be happy.

— Scar (@GrumpyScar) July 22, 2013

Whatever kittens are better than babies anyway

— Tom Hawking (@tom_hawking) July 22, 2013

One major reason to get your royal baby news from the Guardian … pic.twitter.com/QhcX6RXMuP

— Jonathan Haynes (@JonathanHaynes) July 22, 2013


Photomontages were legion:
[rebelmouse-image 27087191 alt="""" original_size="400x400" expand=1]

Source: imgur

Source: Olybop Info

[rebelmouse-image 27087192 alt="""" original_size="500x298" expand=1]

Source: Truly Madly Baby

Several brands even came up with cheeky nods to the royal birth:


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As More Land Turns to Desert, Fights Over Water Erupt In Mongolia

There are too many animals for the available water supply in the Gobi desert region. The situation worsens each year.

Bolortuya Bekh-Ochir, right, and Jargalsuren Tungalagzaya fill a trough with water for a herd of goats outside of Dalanzadgad, Umnugovi province, Mongolia, June 5, 2022.

Uranchimeg Tsogkhuu, Global Press Journal Mongolia.
Uranchimeg Tsogkhuu*

DALANZADGAD — The scorching sun glares at them from directly above, and everything under their feet is parched, dusty and barren. The sheep and goats squeal and squeak, their nostrils sunken, their eyes glazed. Batbaatar Tsedevsuren, a herder with more than two decades of experience, knows this is how his animals behave when extremely thirsty.

He has walked with his 700 animals for several days in Mongolia’s Gobi desert in search of water and green pastures, when suddenly Batbaatar sees a well, and a fellow herder sitting on its edge. He comes closer with a smile, he later recalls, but the herder doesn’t reciprocate. “There is no water in the well,” the other herder quickly says. Batbaatar knows that isn’t true, and that the herder is just acting stingy. But he can’t afford a fight.

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