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Putin's Tiger Goes Rogue, Attacks Chinese Chickens

A Siberian tiger released into the wild by Russian President Vladimir Putin has attacked a henhouse in northeastern China, raising concerns that farmers may now have to hunt it down, according to Chinese media reports quoted by the AP.

The official Xinhua news agency says the animal, known as Kuzya, was believed to have eaten five chickens in a raid on a farm in Luobei county, Heilongjiang province, over recent days.

Earlier this week, Russian officials tracking the tiger to try and capture it had reported that the animal had defected to China. It had been released into the wild from remote Siberia under the president's watchful eye in May, notes The Independent.

Putin's love of animals is well known. The Washington Post writes that this fact about the macho former KGB agent beguiles political scientists — though they realize animals are great for photo opportunities. From dolphins to polar bears and horses to puppies (and everything in between) the president is never shy of sharing media attention with the animal kingdom.

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Photo: Russian Prime Minister's Office

It is estimated that there are only 400-500 Siberian tigers left in the wild, and efforts to save them from extinction are ongoing.

Main photo: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

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Society

The Queen’s Death Is The Perfect Time To Talk About What's Wrong With The Monarchy

Not everyone in Britain is mourning the death of the Queen. There is increasing concern about how the monarch's death is being used to repress freedom of expression and protest.

Queen Elizabeth II's coffin being carried during a Ceremonial Procession in London on Sept. 14

The main thing I remember from Princess Diana’s funeral is how fast the hearse drove.

I was 11, perched on a relative’s shoulders to see over the crowd, expecting the arrival of a solemn procession. But this was the M1 motorway, heading out of London, 100 kilometers still to reach Althorp, Diana’s final resting place. So the motorcade was going full speed — and I only caught a glimpse.

But I also remember all the people lining the M1, and cars stopped on the opposite side of the motorway. The country — and yes, the world — literally came to a standstill. More than 31 million people in the UK watched the Westminster Abbey funeral on television (1 in every 2 people), and an estimated 2.5 billion worldwide.

Fast-forward 25 years. Following British media from afar, you’d be forgiven for thinking the same outpouring of grief is happening for Queen Elizabeth II. Yes, more than a million people have queued up for miles to see the Queen lying in state. Yet despite blanket media coverage, public sentiment is not as universal, this time around.

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