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The Monday edition of Bangladeshi newspaper The Daily Starfeatures photos of the suspected attackers of the Gulshan café siege in the capital Dhaka that killed 22 people, including 17 foreigners.

In this second day of a two-day national mourning in Bangladesh, the newspaper published the photos of the suspected attackers that have were first posted by US-based Site Intelligence, which monitors jihadi activities, saying the images were released by global terror group Islamic State (ISIS).

Under the photographs, The Daily Star provided some of the initial details of the attackers, culled from both official sources and social media users. Most of the suspected attackers had been reported missing for several months by their loved ones, and were from relatively well-off families.

The assault began on Friday evening, as gunmen burst into the Holey Artisan Bakery and O' Kitchen Restaurant in Dhaka's upscale neighborhood Gulshan, shouting ‘Allahu Akbar', and taking the employees and customers hostage. Later, the assailants killed two policemen who had tried to end the siege

Twenty hostages were found dead Saturday on the premises, a popular address for tourists. Nine of the victims were from Italy, seven from Japan, an Indian citizen and three Bangladeshis, one of whom was also a US citizen.

Thirteen hostages were rescued. The Bangladesh Army said six attackers had been killed and another captured alive during the rescue operation.

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Russia

How The War In Ukraine Could Overturn Everyone's Plans For The Arctic

Russia owns 60% of Arctic coastline and half of the region's population. In recent history, NATO has not been overly concerned with the defense of the Arctic region because the U.S. military has been focused on the Middle East. This is all changing since Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

Photo of employees walking through frozen installations at the Utrenneye field in Murmansk Region, Russia.

At the Utrenneye field in Murmansk Region, Russia.

Kateryna Mola

-Analysis-

KYIV — As important as the Arctic is for studying climate control and ecology, various states have eyes on it for another reason: resources. Climate change has made the Arctic more accessible for mining, and much of that area is in the Russian Arctic. In order to exploit these potential natural resources, Russia turned to foreign investors and foreign technology, from both the West and China. The war in Ukraine is throwing all of that into question.

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Russia's invasion of Ukraine will have a profoundly devastating impact on the development of Russian Arctic infrastructure, as well as shipping routes through the Arctic. Western companies have left or are about to leave the market, and counter-sanctions threaten those who still cooperate with the Russians.

Given that Russia does not produce the sophisticated equipment to operate in such a complex region and soon will not even be able to repair the equipment it possesses, we can expect Russia's activity in the Arctic to slow down.

Yet, Vladimir Putin has continued to emphasize the Arctic as a priority region, and extended invitations to cooperate to both India and China.

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