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France's former President Nicolas Sarkozy announced his bid to become the Republican party's candidate in next year's presidential election. He did so despite his previous claim that he wouldn't run again. (See our Extra! feature for more) Sarkozy will focus on tax and budget cuts, stopping economic migrants and "organizing Islam," according to French newspaper Le Figaro. But like politicians running for the top job in the U.S., his campaign hardly feels like a fresh start.


Although it was decided last month that no charges would be filed against Hillary Clinton regarding her use of a private email server during her time as secretary of state, the Democratic presidential nominee is still being investigated by the State Department. Just yesterday, a federal judge ordered the release of 15,000 emails uncovered during the investigation. Her Republican rival Donald Trump is also running with a lot of baggage: A New York Times investigation found the real estate mogul had $650 million of debt, twice the amount he's officially stated.


Back in France, Sarkozy, 61, faces a long list of legal proceedings, including two for which he's being investigated and could face trial. There's the Bygmalion scandal, in which he's accused of letting his party exceed the campaign funding limit during the 2012 election. Sarkozy has also been under investigation for corruption and influence peddling since 2014. He is suspected of having put pressure on a judge to obtain private details on another case in which he was implicated.


It's not surprising, then, that even in new elections, we feel like we're seeing more of the same — across both sides of the Atlantic.

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Ideas

García Márquez And Truth: How Journalism Fed The Novelist's Fantasy

In his early journalistic writings, the Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez showed he had an eye for factual details, in which he found the absurdity and 'magic' that would in time be the stuff and style of his fiction.

Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez reads his book

J. D. Torres Duarte

BOGOTÁ — In short stories written in the 1940s and early 50s and later compiled in Eyes of a Blue Dog, the late Gabriel García Márquez, Colombia's Nobel Prize-winning novelist, shows he is as yet a young writer, with a style and subjects that can be atypical.

Stylistically, García Márquez came into his own in the celebrated One Hundred Years of Solitude. Until then both his style and substance took an erratic course: touching the brevity of film scripts in Nobody Writes to the Colonel, technical experimentation in Leaf Storm, the anecdotal short novel in In Evil Hour or exploring politics in Big Mama's Funeral. Throughout, the skills he displayed were rather of a precocious juggler.

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