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El Comercio, June 6, 2016

"Vote by vote" reads the front page of Peruvian daily El Comercio Monday, as ballots are still being counted after Sunday's presidential election, the second-round vote being too close to call last night.

The front page features a painting of the two main candidates, Pedro Pablo Kuczynski from the center-right party Peruvians for Change and Keiko Fujimori, from the conservative Popular Force, who are neck and neck in what some are calling Peru's tightest presidential election in the last three decades.

According to the latest estimates, Kuczynski has taken a slight lead with 50,52% of the votes, while Fujimori is right behind with 49,48%, with 88% of votes counted.

Kuczynski, a former Wall Street investor, has pledged to spur employment and promote economic growth, while Fujimori — the daughter of Peru's former president Alberto Fujimori, now in jail for crimes against humanity — has vowed to tackle crime.

Although a favorite in the election, Fujimori has recently faced corruption scandals in her party that may have damaged her popularity.

The successor to leftist President Ollanta Humala will be known later this Monday as votes from the country's rural areas are being counted.

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Ideas

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Elon Musk bought Twitter in the name of absolute freedom. But numerous research shows that social media hate speech leads to actual violence. Musk and others running social networks need to strike a balance.

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Freedom on social networks can result in insults and defamation

Jean-Marc Vittori

-Analysis-

PARIS — Elon Musk is the world's leading reckless driver. The ever unpredictable CEO of Tesla and SpaceX is now behind a very different wheel as the new head of Twitter.

He began by banning remote work before slightly backtracking and authorizing it for the company’s “significant contributors.” Now he’s opened the door to Donald Trump to return to Twitter, while at the same time vaunting a decrease in the number of hate-messages that appear on the social network…all while firing Twitter’s content moderation teams.

But this time, the world’s richest man will have to make choices. He’ll have to limit his otherwise unconditional love of free speech. “Freedom consists of being able to do everything that does not harm others,” proclaimed the French-born Declaration of the Rights of Man in 1789.

Yet freedom on social networks results not only in insults and defamation, but sometimes also in physical aggression.

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