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Wednesday's front page of Icelandic-language daily Fréttablaðið shows Iceland's embattled Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson being asked questions by journalists in Reykjavik's Althing, the national parliament, as the future of the ruling coalition is uncertain in the wake of the Panama Papers scandal.

Gunnlaugsson had apparently resigned yesterday amid the uproar of the Panama Papers revelations of offshore accounts, but followed that up by saying his decision had nothing to do with the leak, and that actually he was just stepping aside for an unspecified amount of time. The leaked documents revealed that Gunnlaugsson's wife owned an offshore company with substantial claims on Iceland's crashed banks.

According to Fréttablaðið, nearly 70% of Icelandic citizens also want Minister of Finance and Economic Affairs and leader of the Icelandic Independence Party Bjarni Benediktsson to resign.

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Geopolitics

Why The 'Perfect Storm' Of Iran's Protests May Be Unstoppable

The latest round of anti-regime protests in Iran is different than other in the 40 years of the Islamic Republic: for its universality and boldness, the level of public fury and grief, and the role of women and social media. The target is not some policy or the economy, but the regime itself.

A woman holds a lock of her hair during a London rally to protest the murder of Mahsa Amini in London

Roshanak Astaraki

-Analysis-

The death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in Tehran on Sept. 16, after a possible beating at a police station, has sparked outrage and mass protests in Iran and abroad. There have been demonstrations and a violent attempt to suppress them in more than 100 districts in every province of Iran.

These protests may look like others since 2017, and back even to 1999 — yet we may be facing an unprecedented turning point in Iranians' opposition to the Islamic Republic. Indeed newly installed conservative President Ibrahim Raisi could not have expected such momentum when he set off for a quick trip to New York and back for a meeting of the UN General Assembly.

For one of the mistakes of a regime that takes pride in dismissing the national traditions of Iran is to have overlooked the power of grief among our people.

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