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North Korea's Kim Jong Il dies; South goes on high alert

Seoul put South Korean forces on high alert and Pyongyang urged an increase in its "military capability" as the death of North Korea's leader Kim Jong Il spurred fresh security concerns in the tense region.

(CNN) Seoul - A tearful state TV broadcaster reported Kim's death Monday. She said the 69-year-old leader died Saturday due to "overwork" while "dedicating his life to the people."

North Korea's official KCNA news agency said Kim suffered "great mental and physical strain" while on a train. Kim, who had been treated for "cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases for a long period," suffered a heart attack on Saturday and couldn't be saved despite the use of "every possible first-aid measure," according to the agency.

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Geopolitics

Russia, Ukraine And The West's Double Standard On International Law

With a passion that recalls the aftermath of World War II, politicians and commentators are demanding a global order that takes seriously the rules of the United Nations Charter — notably on respect for sovereignty and fundamental human rights.

During an emergency session on March 2, the UN General Assembly voted overwhelmingly to adopt a resolution condemning Russia on its invasion of Ukraine.

Amyn Sajoo

While Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is the immediate spur, China’s conduct in the Indo-Pacific region has prompted similar calls.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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It’s more than a fight between autocracies and democracies, Fareed Zakaria recently argued in the Washington Post. This moment requires a rules-based international order that has inclusive global appeal beyond western interests.

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