When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

It has finally begun. More than two years since ISIS conquered Iraq's third-biggest city, a coalition of local ground forces, supported by U.S. air power, has launched a coordinated attack to recapture Mosul. "The time of victory has come and operations to liberate Mosul have started," Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said in a televised address early today. But the battle for Mosul, dubbed by some "the mother of all battles," and the most crucial so far in defeating ISIS, will in all likelihood be a long and difficult one.

  • A coalition of more than 30,000 troops from the Iraqi army, Kurdish peshmerga fighters and Shia militias are approaching the city from the north, east and southern side in a first stage that aims to surround the city. Airstrikes from the U.S.-led coalition have started to hit ISIS targets.
  • Estimates on the number of jihadist fighters in Mosul vary from 4,000 to 8,000. The Guardian reports that many have already moved into residential areas to use the civilian population as a human shield against airstrikes. More than one million people still live in the city. Many global organization, including the UN, have warned of a humanitarian crisis as civilians will flee the city.
  • The New York Times explains that this first stage of the battle aims to cut off ISIS' supply route through Turkey and isolate what has been an important and strategic stronghold for the terrorists. But it also says that militants have prepared for a tough urban battle, with a network of tunnels and explosives planted "so densely that they resemble minefields."
  • Disputes among different groups involved in the fight against ISIS have already erupted over the future of Mosul, according to Middle East Eye. One scenario is that the city will become part of the autonomous Kurdish region of Iraq, with some hoping to see it become an independent Kurdish state. But it's safe to say that neither Turkey — which is staunchly opposed to any Kurdish reinforcement — nor the Iraqi government would accept such an outcome.
  • Beyond control of the city itself, what would a defeat mean for ISIS? Losing Mosul will be a considerable blow to its territorial ambitions, finances, and image. The terrorist organization, however, still controls a vast chunk of eastern Syria, where many of its Mosul-based leaders and fighters are believed to have already fled.
Keep reading... Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

Our 'Emotional' Divide: How The Ukraine War Reveals A World Broken In Two

Russia's invasion has created a stark global divide: them and us. On one side are the countries refusing to condemn Moscow, with the West on the other. It's a dangerous split that could have repercussions far into the future.

Protesters against the war in Ukraine demonstrate in front of the Russian embassy in London

Dominique Moïsi

-Analysis-

PARIS — "The West and the Rest of Us." That's the title of a 1975 essay written by Nigerian essayist and critic Chinweizu Ibekwe. I've been thinking about his words as the war in Ukraine both reveals and accelerates divisions of the world that I believe are ultimately "emotional" in nature.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

With war returning to Europe and the risk of escalation, there is a gap between the Western view and that of the "others," a distinct "us and them." This gap cannot be explained in strictly geographical, political, and economic terms.

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ