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Meet Camillo, Germany's Roaming Facebook Cat

EICHSTATT —Camillo the cat nearly missed his TV appearance. The one-year-old feline belongs to the Auer family in the this Bavarian town of 14,000, but he is anything but a house cat. No, Camillo spends his days and nights attending parties around town, visiting art galleries, and catching a cat nap in a comfortable chair in the office of a loan officer at a local bank.

With all this exploration, the German daily Suddeutsche Zeitung reports, the Auers grew tired of looking for their itinerant kitty all the time, and decided to open a Facebook page to track him along with their phone number posted around town from bakery shops to the municipal library.

And the good folk of Eichstätt are happy to play along. They like the cat’s moxie, have dubbed him Camillo the Town Cat, and post photos and messages about him on the Facebook page. This is a relief to Camillo’s owners because a glance at the page gives them an approximate idea of their pet’s whereabouts.

To get him home for filming for a television program, the Auers posted a word on Facebook and — 138 "likes" and ten comments later — somebody reported seeing Camillo snoozing on the sidewalk outside a music store.

The Auers got him home and have to try and keep him there at least until the camera crew has finished filming.

Photo: via facebook

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Geopolitics

How To Welcome Russians Fleeing Conscription? Europe Should Be Careful

Europe should welcome the exodus of conscientious objectors from Russia. But the conditions vary across the continent, and there needs to be some security precautions.

Russian nationals entering Georgia at the Verkhny Lars checkpoint on the Russian-Georgian border.

Jacques Schuster

-Analysis-

BERLIN — Russia's President Vladimir Putin is currently suffering his greatest defeat in the battle for terrain, but also public opinion.

The Kremlin may spread as much propaganda as it likes, but the pictures of kilometer-long lines of cars at the borders and thousands of young men fleeing abroad to avoid the draft with hastily packed bags show clearly what the Russian population thinks of Moscow's war of aggression.

In this sense, one can only hope that the stream will continue to flow for a long time.

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But how should European governments deal with the mass of fleeing conscientious objectors?

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