Martyrs And Mixed Messages On Anniversary Of Libya Revolution

Post-Gaddafi Libya is a mix of newfound freedom and political instability. The latest news includes worries of an impending coup d"état after a top general suggested that the way forward for the country was to suspend Parliament.

Still, Libyans celebrated – or at least were free to acknowledge – the third anniversary of their 2011 revolution that overthrew long-time dictator Muammar Gaddafi. It was Feb. 17, 2011, when members of the Libyan opposition declared a "day of rage" against the regime, which culminated in Gaddafi's death during the ensuing civil war.

Despite serious security concerns, Libyans seemed to share a guarded optimism about the state of the nation. Here's how it looked on Twitter.

One of the more hopeful posts included a festive photo of decorated streets, and the declaration: "Libya is celebrating its third year of freedom, today everything is under control and accounted for, God is great."

ليبيا تحتفل بالعام الثالث من الحرية ،، لاخوف في ليبيا بعد اليوم الكل تحت الرقابة والمحاسبة ،، لاكبير إلا الله. pic.twitter.com/SfwtpYYTcg

— عمر بن عبدالعزيز (@oamaz7) February 17, 2014

A young Libyan woman living in the city of Misrata — where the revolution was born — tweeted a message of thanks to those who had died in the uprising.

It is now #Feb17 . I just want to take this opportunity to thank our Martyrs who died for us and our Freedom Fighters.” #ليبيا

— Omaimah_Basheer (@omaimahbt) February 17, 2014

Images of martyrs were also tweeted, accompanied by prayers. One tweet remembers pilot Muhammad Mubarak Al-Aqili.

الشهيد العقيد طيار محمد مبارك العقيلي صاحب اليمين الشهير "عليا اليمين بنغازي ما تخشها يا معمر" pic.twitter.com/IH1JtiV77A

— تغريدات ليبيا (@LibyaTopTweets) February 17, 2014

Another similar tweet reads, "#memories of the revolution #that we may not forget the martyr Muhammad Nabus."

#ذكريات_الثورة #لكي_لا_ننسي الشهيد محمد نبوس pic.twitter.com/MHgmHnrMcT

— Tawfik Bensaud (@TBensaud) February 17, 2014

Using the same hashtag, a young Libyan woman in the revolutionary town of Benghazi recalled: "#memories of the revolution — making food for the thuwar revolutionaries."

#ذكريات_الثورة making food for the thuwar ✌️

— R. (@3doditee) February 16, 2014

Not all tweets were thankful and celebratory, however. ">The same young Libyan woman who tweeted about making food also recalled: "#memories of the revolution — when we could walk around Benghazi alone and still feel safe!"

Twitter debates also ensued over whether a revolution actually happened, and whether it has been successful.

For All Those Who Don't believe The Revolution Was Successful. #17Feb #Libya pic.twitter.com/IrseMuNUXK

— Areej أريج ↑ (@3alaDil3owna) February 17, 2014

Still, the tone on the ground seemed to be one of guarded optimism. One tweet featured an image of a Libyan man carrying a poster, reading, "In spite of the shortcomings, I will celebrate the February 17th anniversary."

Dear negative people #Libya pic.twitter.com/gCvyP4XCpz

— R. (@3doditee) February 17, 2014

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Geopolitics

REvil Bust: Is Russian Cybercrime Crackdown Just A Decoy From Ukraine?

This weekend’s unprecedented operation to dismantle the cybercriminal REvil network in Russia was carried out on a request and information from Washington. Occurring just as the two countries face off over the Russian threat to invade Ukraine raises more questions than it answers.

Kyiv blamed Russia for another cyber-attack that knocked out key Ukrainian government websites last week

Cameron Manley

The world’s attention was gripped last week by the rising risk of war at the Russia-Ukraine border, and what some have called the worst breakdown in relations between Moscow and Washington since the end of the Cold War. Yet by the end of the week, another major story was unfolding more quietly across Russia that may shed light on the high-stakes geopolitical maneuvering.

By Friday night, Russian security forces had raided 25 addresses in St. Petersburg, Moscow and several other regions south of the capital in an operation to dismantle the notorious REvil group, accused of some of the worst cyberattacks in recent years to hit targets in the U.S. and elsewhere in the West.

And by Saturday, Russian online media Interfax was reporting that the FSB Russian intelligence services revealed that it had in fact been the U.S. authorities who had informed Russia "about the leaders of the criminal community and their involvement in attacks on the information resources of foreign high-tech companies.”

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