When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

x

SPOTLIGHT: LOST IN BRAZIL, DILMA CAN WAIT

Brazil has won its first gold medal in Rio (courtesy of judoka Rafaela Silva), and other national athletes — especially soccer players after the 2014 World Cup fiasco — will obviously be looking to add to that tally. But one area where the hosts certainly won't be claiming any prizes is organization. Sure, after months of doomsday warnings, the Olympic constructions were ultimately completed in time, but a scathing report in Folha de S. Paulo points its finger at a surprising failure: the Olympic volunteers.


The São Paulo daily chronicled the abysmal level of preparation, with some of volunteers incapable of even helping fellow Brazilians find their way around Rio de Janeiro. When asked about the location of the badminton events, one volunteer replied, "I think it's in Deodoro. Nobody's ever asked me that. But look, don't go there. If I'm wrong, you'll end up being angry."


Anecdotes like this can be shrugged off, especially in the face of far more dire pre-Games warnings about security and Zika. But there's also a less amusing side to it: In many ways, this level of administrative amateurism is symptomatic of Brazil's political woes, the ugly flipside of locals loveable just-go-with-the-flow demeanor. With the latest Senate vote moving President Dilma Rousseff closer to impeachment, most will now set the drama aside as the Games continue for the next 10 days. In the meantime, Brazilians will be rooting for a few more golds — if they can just find their way to the stadium.

Keep reading... Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

The Days After: What Would Happen If Putin Opts For A Tactical Nuclear Strike

The risk of the Kremlin launching a tactical nuclear weapon on Ukraine is small but not impossible. The Western response would itself set off a counter-response, which might contain or spiral to the worst-case scenario.

An anti-nuclear activist impersonates Vladimir Putin at a rally in Berlin.

Yves Bourdillon

-Analysis-

PARISVladimir Putin could “go nuclear” in Ukraine. Yes, this expression, which metaphorically means “taking the extreme, drastic action,” is now literally considered a possibility as well. Cornered and humiliated by a now plausible military defeat, experts say the Kremlin could launch a tactical nuclear bomb on a Ukrainian site in a desperate attempt to turn the tables.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

In any case, this is what Putin — who put Russia's nuclear forces on alert just after the start of the invasion in late February — is aiming to achieve: to terrorize populations in Western countries to push their leaders to let go of Ukraine.

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ