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El Tiempo — Sept. 26, 2016

"Peace after 267,162 dead," declares the stark headline on the front page of newspaper El Tiempoon Monday as Colombia gets ready for a historic accord between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). The Latin American country has seen war for 52 years in a conflict that's claimed hundreds of thousands of lives.

El Tiempo newspaper paid homage to those victims by including a list of their names in the backdrop of its front page.

President Juan Manuel Santos and FARC Commander Rodrigo Londoño Echeverri, known by the nom de guerre Timoshenko, will sign a 297-page agreement at a ceremony in Cartagena in northern Colombia later today. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon are expected to attend the event.

The peace deal was first agreed upon on Aug. 24, with a ceasefire coming into effect five days later. "The signature of the deal is simply the end of the conflict. Then the hard work starts, reconstructing our country," Santos told the BBC.

Actually, there's one more step. The agreement must be approved by citizens in a national referendum scheduled for Oct. 2.

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Vladimir Putin delivers a speech to Russian people following the results of the referendum dealing with the annexation in four regions of Ukraine partly controlled by Moscow

Cameron Manley, Bertrand Hauger, Chloe Touchard, and Emma Albright

In a wide-ranging and provocative speech, Russian President Vladimir Putin has announced the annexation of four Ukraine regions, which Putin says now make Luhansk, Donetsk, Zaporizhzhia and Kherson officially part of Russia.

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Speaking in the Kremlin’s St George’s Hall, the much-anticipated address to the Russian nation follows the so-called "referendums" in the occupied areas of the four Ukrainian regions — which the West condemned as shams held under gunpoint. Friday’s annexation comes as Russia is losing territory on the ground following a successful Ukrainian counter-offensive.

Putin directly addressed the leaders of Ukraine and "their real masters in the West," that the annexation was "for everyone to remember. People living in Luhansk and Donetsk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia are becoming our citizens. Forever."

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