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American singer Lauryn Hill has released a recorded version on Soundcloud of her track "Black Rage," which she had only played live for the past two years.

The former Fugees frontwoman dedicated the song to the residents of Missouri, where tension is still high after African-American teenager Michael Brown was killed by a police officer earlier this month.

"Black Rage" is based on the American classic "My expand=1] Favorite Things" and was, according to the 39-year-old artist, recorded in her living room. "Strange, the course of things. Peace for MO," Hill writes.

The lyrics are available on her website.

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Society

Jehovah's Witnesses Translate The Bible In Indigenous Language — Is This Colonialism?

The Jehovah's Witnesses in Chile have launched a Bible version translated into the native Mapudungun language, evidently indifferent to the concerns of a nation striving to save its identity from the Western cultural juggernaut.

A Mapuche family awaits for Chilean President Gabriel Boric to arrive at the traditional Te Deum in the Cathedral of Santiago, on Chile's Independence Day.

Claudia Andrade

NEUQUÉN — The Bible can now be read in Mapuzugun, the language of the Mapuche, an ancestral nation living across Chile and Argentina. It took the Chilean branch of the Jehovah's Witnesses, a latter-day Protestant church often associated with door-to-door proselytizing and cold calling, three years to translate it into "21st-century Mapuzugun".

The church's Mapuche members in Chile welcomed the book when it was launched in Santiago last June, but some of their brethren see it rather as a cultural imposition. The Mapuche were historically a fighting nation, and fiercely resisted both the Spanish conquerors and subsequent waves of European settlers. They are still fighting for land rights in Chile.

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