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Society

Prince Harry’s Drama Is Really About Birth Order — Like Royal Siblings Everywhere

Add up all the grievances aired by Prince Harry and you largely get the picture of a second son shut out from real royal power. The British monarchy is not the only one to be shaken by controversies from the non-heirs to the crown.

Photo of Prince Harry and Prince William in military costumes during a Remembrance ceremony in London

Prince Harry and Prince William in military costumes during a Remembrance ceremony in London

Amelie Reichmuth

STOCKHOLM — Unless you live in a cave, you know that Prince Harry has been stirring the proverbial (royal) pot. After he and his wife Meghan Markel stepped back from their duties as senior members of the royal family in January 2020, it’s been one revelation after another, culminating with the publication of the Prince’s saucy memoir this week.

Without discounting the allegations of racism towards his wife, and other slights the pair may have endured, it doesn’t take a PhD in psychology or anthropology to see that the conflicts with Harry’s family — and within himself — may largely be driven by the fact that he’s not his older brother.

The fate of being the second-born son and largely shut out of succession to the throne is indeed written in the very title of his just released book: Spare.

The British monarchy, in this regard, is hardly alone, with no shortage of turbulence created by royal birth order around the world, and through the ages.

Just this month in Sweden, King Carl XVI Gustav created a controversy when an interview quoted him saying that the decision to allow women heirs to be included in the line of succession to the throne was “unfair.”

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