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It Is A 'No' For Rajoy

Spain's political crisis has deepened, after the country's acting prime minister, Mariano Rajoy, lost a parliamentary bid for a second term in office. "84 times no," daily newspaper La Razón wrote on its front page, referring to the socialists who refused to back Rajoy's attempt to stay in power.

The leader of the opposition, Pedro Sánchez, had made clear that his party, the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE), would not endorse their longtime rival.

"Spain needs a government, not a bad government," Sánchez stated during the debate on Rajoy's appointment on Tuesday.

Rajoy failed to reach a majority of at least 176 votes in parliament, securing only the votes of lawmakers from his People's party (PP), with the backing of 33 others. But he could still become prime minister in a second vote on Friday if he manages to pull off a majority vote, although it will require one party or more to abstain.

Spain has spent eight months in a political deadlock with the latest setback likely to dampen the country's economic recovery.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

A First Look At Russia's Ukraine War Veterans, Struggling Back On The Homefront

Hundreds of thousands of Russians have taken part in the war. On returning, many face difficulties to return to normal life and finding work, as independent Russian news outlet Vazhnyye Istorii/Important Stories reports.

Image of a Man waiting in line at Military Employment Office of the Russian Armed Forces​

Man waiting in line at an employment office in Moscow

РЕДАКЦИЯ

MOSCOW — Since the beginning of the full-scale invasion of Ukraine, hundreds of thousands of Russians have taken part in the war. They range from professional soldiers, National Guardsmen, reservists and conscripts to mercenaries of illegal armed groups, including former prisoners.

The exact number of those who survived and returned home is unknown. In the past year alone, about 50,000 citizens received the status “combat veteran”. The actual number of returnees from the front is far higher, but it is often extremely difficult to obtain veteran status and veteran benefits.

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