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SPOTLIGHT: AIRPORT TERROR, BRUSSELS TO ISTANBUL

After a week of Brexit uncertainty and anxiety, outright horror has returned to the top of the news. The wail of sirens and scenes of panic are back on our screens after last night's terrorist attack at Istanbul's airport killed dozens of people. Yet it is not too much of a stretch to connect the bloodshed in Turkey's largest city with the administrative-cum-existential angst spreading from London to Brussels. Not only does basic world geography tell us that Istanbul's Ataturk Airport is firmly on the European continent, but only a few years ago Turkey itself appeared pointed toward European Union membership that many hailed as a bridge between East and West.


There may also be much more literal, and recent, connections. Quoted this morning in the Brussels-based daily Le Soir, Belgium's Foreign Minister Didier Reynders pointed to similarities between yesterday's attack in Istanbul and the one at the Brussels' airport in March, in both the operational tactics and the targeting of the international terminal. As we know, the attack on the Belgian (and EU) capital was carried out by the terrorist group ISIS. And now Turkish authorities indicate ISIS is the likely culprit in Istanbul as well. These days, no matter what the politicians might say or how the people might vote, the Bosphorus and English Channel seem closer than ever.

  • Witnesses say three attackers used assault weapons and bombs to carry out the attack on one of the world's busiest airports.
  • The latest toll has risen to 41 dead and 239 wounded
  • The attack, the latest in a long series to hit Turkey this year, took place hours after Turkey mended ties with Israel and Russia, Hürriyet reports. Russian President Vladimir Putin expressed his condolences after the attack and AFP reports that him and Erdogan held their first phone conversation since Ankara downed one of Moscow's jets in Syria last year.
  • See how Turkish daily Hürriyet "curses" the attackers on its front page.
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The Main COVID Risk Now: Long COVID

Death rates are down, masks are off, but many who have been infected by COVID have still not recovered. Long COVID continues to be hard to diagnose and treatments are still in the developmental stage.

Long COVID feels like a never-ending nightmare for those who suffer from it.

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PARIS — The medical examination took longer than expected in the Parc de Castelnau-le-Lez clinic, near the southern French city of Montpellier. Jocelyne had come to see a specialist for long COVID-19, and exits the appointment slowly with help from her son. The meeting lasted more than an hour, twice as long as planned.

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