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Uschi, scratching herself on the leg, takes a picture of her udder. Fat Lola, who is mainly interested in eating, keeps her head down, which means the photos she takes are close-ups of grass blades.

Only old Frida shows considerably more artistic talent, because she looks around while chewing her cud and takes in the mountainous Swiss landscape. Her sharp-focused shots are of meadows and Alpine peaks, clouds, valleys and wild flowers.

"Frida is our star photographer," Christoph Sigrist, 59, tells Die Welt. It was seven years ago that the Swiss farmer from the half-canton of Baselland first mounted a self-releasing digital camera in a cowbell through which he'd bored a hole.

What began as a gag grew into a successful art project. Sigrist posted the pictures his cows shot on his website cowcam.ch, and he has just published the most interesting shots in an entertaining book called Cowcam.

What do the animals find interesting? The farmer's arrival. Flowers growing beyond the meadow fence. The milking stool. And because cows are sociable, they take many pictures of one another.

Sigrist put his cowcam together himself, using a Mr. Lee Catcam from the United States. It has an individually programmable release mechanism and was originally invented for use by cats. It is the only digital camera that self-releases at intervals that can go for an entire day without a battery change.
Slightly larger than a matchbox, it can take up to 120 pictures per day, one every seven to 10 minutes. Sigrist removes the camera-bells from the animals at night.

After a couple years of equipping his own dairy cows with camera bells, Sigrist found that animals' photo subjects were becoming repetitive. "Cows are creatures of habit," he says. "They have their favorite places where they lie down every day for a snooze."

So he began sending other farmers across Switzerland camera-equipped bells. They in turn hung the bells on their favorite cows and sent the chips back to Sigrist, who found that about every tenth shot was interesting. He has since published some 20,000 cowcam photos, and plans to continue in 2015.

The only shots he can't publish are those the cows take of walkers because doing so would violate privacy rights.

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Society

Mahsa Amini, Martyr Of An Iranian Regime Designed To Abuse Women

The 22-year-old is believed to have been beaten to death at a Tehran police station last week after "morality police" had reprimanded her clothing. The case has sparked the nation's outrage. But as ordinary Iranians testify, such beatings, torture and a home brand of misogyny are hallmarks of the 40-year Islamic Republic of Iran.

Mahsa Amini

Firouzeh Nordstrom

-Analysis-

TEHRAN — The death in Iran of a 22-year-old Mahsa Amini — after she was arrested by the so-called "morality police" — has unleashed another wave of protests, as thousands of Iranians vent their fury against an intrusive and violent regime. Indeed, as tragically exceptional as the circumstances appear, the reaction reflects the daily reality of abuse by authorities, especially directed toward women

Amini, a Kurdish-Iranian girl visiting Tehran with relatives, was detained by the regime's morality patrols on Sept. 13, apparently for not respecting the Islamic dress code that includes proper use of the hijab headscarf. Amini was declared dead two or three days after being taken into custody. Officials say she fainted and died, and blamed a preexisting heart condition. But neither her family nor anyone else in Iran believe that, as can be seen in the mounting protests that have now left at least three dead.

For Amini's was hardly the first arbitrary arrest, or the first suspected death in custody under Iran's Islamic regime.

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