I Am Not Prosciutto: Welcome To Italy's Pig Rescue Shelter

Federica Trivelli got her first pig as a birthday present in 2009. Today, there are about 20 in her land in Vigone, which has its own Facebook page called The Little Animal Farm.

But, unlike the Orwellian nightmare, these pigs are anything but evil.

"All the pigs have been abused, or have been saved from slaughterhouses," says Federica, whose day job is working as a secretary in an architect's studio. "Often they come here injured and get put back on track by veterinarians. But they don't always survive."

From fridge magnets to piggy banks, pigs are everywhere in Federica's house. And on the farm, which is self-financed, she has decided to build a paradise for them — along with five dogs and 10 cats. "Here they can be together in a herd and "root," which is basically digging," she says.

The message behind the project is simple: pigs should not be seen as meat, that they're very intelligent and sociable creatures — and they make great pets.

Flanked by a team of volunteers, Federica wants to create an association, where school children can come and visit, says La Stampa. This isn't just a "vegetarian's" battle: "Many carnivores are intrigued and surprised by the animals," she notes.

The pigs here range from 50 kilograms to four quintals, there are the classic pink pigs, as well as black ones crossed with boars. Each of them gets a name: Ginger, Hercules, Zorro. "They come when they're called and every grunt means something," Federica assures us.

L-R: Lamù, Nemesi, Yoghi, Barney, Ebe & Fred — Photos: La Piccola Fattoria degli Animali (The Little Animal Farm) via Facebook

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Mariam Nabattu, a religious studies teacher, must work at two schools in central Uganda to make ends meet.

Patricia Lindrio/GPJ Uganda
Edna Namara and Patricia Lindrio

KAMPALA — Allen Asimwe has dedicated more than two decades to teaching geography at a large public high school in southwestern Uganda. Her retirement age, as a public servant entitled to benefits, is just six years away.

She doubts she will wait that long.

“I am determined, I want to quit,” she says, calculating that she could earn more by shifting full time to the salon she opened six years ago to supplement her income. “Given the frustration, I cannot continue in class anymore.”

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