When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!
I Am Not Prosciutto: Welcome To Italy's Pig Rescue Shelter

Federica Trivelli got her first pig as a birthday present in 2009. Today, there are about 20 in her land in Vigone, which has its own Facebook page called The Little Animal Farm.

But, unlike the Orwellian nightmare, these pigs are anything but evil.

"All the pigs have been abused, or have been saved from slaughterhouses," says Federica, whose day job is working as a secretary in an architect's studio. "Often they come here injured and get put back on track by veterinarians. But they don't always survive."

From fridge magnets to piggy banks, pigs are everywhere in Federica's house. And on the farm, which is self-financed, she has decided to build a paradise for them — along with five dogs and 10 cats. "Here they can be together in a herd and "root," which is basically digging," she says.

The message behind the project is simple: pigs should not be seen as meat, that they're very intelligent and sociable creatures — and they make great pets.

Flanked by a team of volunteers, Federica wants to create an association, where school children can come and visit, says La Stampa. This isn't just a "vegetarian's" battle: "Many carnivores are intrigued and surprised by the animals," she notes.

The pigs here range from 50 kilograms to four quintals, there are the classic pink pigs, as well as black ones crossed with boars. Each of them gets a name: Ginger, Hercules, Zorro. "They come when they're called and every grunt means something," Federica assures us.

L-R: Lamù, Nemesi, Yoghi, Barney, Ebe & Fred — Photos: La Piccola Fattoria degli Animali (The Little Animal Farm) via Facebook

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Green

Fading Flavor: Production Of Saffron Declines Sharply

Saffron is well-known for its flavor and its expense. But in Kashmir, one of the flew places it grows, cultivation has fallen dramatically thanks for climate change, industry, and farming methods.

Photo of women harvesting saffron in Kashmir

Harvesting of Saffron in Kashmir

Mubashir Naik

In northern India along the bustling Jammu-Srinagar national highway near Pampore — known as the saffron town of Kashmir —people are busy picking up saffron flowers to fill their wicker baskets.

During the autumn season, this is a common sight in the Valley as saffron harvesting is celebrated like a festival in Kashmir. The crop is harvested once a year from October 21 to mid-November.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest

InterNations