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Helicopter Crashes During London Rush Hour, At Least Two Dead

BBC, SKY NEWS, THE GUARDIAN (UK)

Worldcrunch

LONDON - A helicopter crashed during London's morning rush hour on Wednesday, killing two people and wounding 11 others.

The incident happened at St George’s Wharf on the River Thames near Vauxhall, in southern London. According to The Guardian the helicopter hit a crane on a building site.

Scotland Yard has confirmed two deaths so far in the crash and 11 other people have been taken to hospital. Of the two fatalities, one was travelling in the helicopter and of the eleven injured, only one is critically injured.

The Guardian reports that Metropolitan Police have evacuated offices around the scene as the crane is in a “precarious position.” BBC reports that the RNLI (Lifeboat Services) are now searching the river after reported sightings of a person.

Aviation expert, Chris Yates told Sky News that any tall structure must have a warning light on top to alert pilots. The question is whether there was a warning light on the crane and whether the pilot would have been able to see it in the foggy conditions this morning. The circumstances are not yet known – whether there was a problem with the helicopter itself, or whether the pilot misread his instructions or received false instructions from air traffic control.

The incident occurred shortly after 8 A.M. local time, and many commuters witnessed the incident. A train happened to be crossing the bridge at the same time as the crash, with a lot of people posting pictures and videos on social media sites. Many told the BBC that a huge explosion was heard and then they saw a ball of fire.

Mad! RT @oog: Here's a very clear picture of the crane at #vauxhalltwitter.com/Oog/status/291…

— Jme (Jamie Adenuga) (@JmeBBK) January 16, 2013

Heard a massive bang, major fire on Wandsworth Rd, police, fire brigade everywhere.Roads closed #Vauxhall#NineElmstwitter.com/ColinDKavanagh…

— Colin Kavanagh (@ColinDKavanagh) January 16, 2013

#vauxhall#helicopter RT @vctrjmnz: A helicopter crashed minutes ago on Wandsworth road twitter.com/vctrjmnz/statu…

— Lawrence (@leisuresuitlawl) January 16, 2013

2 dead in #helicopter crash in #Vauxhall, South London - latest update .. m.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-englan…twitter.com/ADELiCi0US/sta…

— Adelyn xo (@ADELiCi0US) January 16, 2013

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Bucha To Bakhmut, Mariupol To Maryinka: Our Brutal Introduction To Ukraine's 'Hero Cities'

The world has come to know Ukraine’s geography through decisive battles and unspeakable war crimes in places like Mariupol, Bucha and now Bakhmut. We zoom in on what these places mean for the war, in both strategic and symbolic terms.

Bucha To Bakhmut, Mariupol To Maryinka: Our Brutal Introduction To Ukraine's 'Hero Cities'

Ukrainian soldiers preparing a tank for combat on the Bakhmut front.

Before Russia's invasion of Ukraine, Bakhmut, an eastern city of just over 70,000, was known across the region for its sparkling wine and salt mines – and around the world, it was barely known at all.

Through cruel coincidences of fate and geography, the names of places like Bakhmut have become iconic as they appear in newspaper headlines, day after day.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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Now, Bakhmut joins the annals of history alongside places like Iwo Jima, Gallipoli or Falluja that appeared on the map in pitched battles. Or like Aleppo — introduced to many around the world as the site of atrocities during the Syrian Civil War, though known to both history and food buffs for its UNESCO-recognized ancient souk and thousands of years of multicultural culinary wonders.

Over the past 15 months, the world has come to know Ukrainian geography, often in the most tragic circumstances. Just a few weeks after Russia's full-scale invasion in Feb. 2022, the Ukrainian government recognized 14 cities, including Kherson, Mariupol, Bucha and Irpin, as “Hero Cities” – a distinction dating back to World War II, when the Soviet Union recognized cities like Kyiv and Stalingrad (present-day Volgograd) for their residents’ bravery and determination in the face of the Nazi invasion.

After more than a year of full-scale war and as Ukraine's long-awaited counterattack nears, we look at some of the places that have become the site of crucial battles in the ongoing conflict, forever seared into posterity:

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