When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

BBC, SKY NEWS, THE GUARDIAN (UK)

Worldcrunch

LONDON - A helicopter crashed during London's morning rush hour on Wednesday, killing two people and wounding 11 others.

The incident happened at St George’s Wharf on the River Thames near Vauxhall, in southern London. According to The Guardian the helicopter hit a crane on a building site.

Scotland Yard has confirmed two deaths so far in the crash and 11 other people have been taken to hospital. Of the two fatalities, one was travelling in the helicopter and of the eleven injured, only one is critically injured.

The Guardian reports that Metropolitan Police have evacuated offices around the scene as the crane is in a “precarious position.” BBC reports that the RNLI (Lifeboat Services) are now searching the river after reported sightings of a person.

Aviation expert, Chris Yates told Sky News that any tall structure must have a warning light on top to alert pilots. The question is whether there was a warning light on the crane and whether the pilot would have been able to see it in the foggy conditions this morning. The circumstances are not yet known – whether there was a problem with the helicopter itself, or whether the pilot misread his instructions or received false instructions from air traffic control.

The incident occurred shortly after 8 A.M. local time, and many commuters witnessed the incident. A train happened to be crossing the bridge at the same time as the crash, with a lot of people posting pictures and videos on social media sites. Many told the BBC that a huge explosion was heard and then they saw a ball of fire.

Mad! RT @oog: Here's a very clear picture of the crane at #vauxhalltwitter.com/Oog/status/291…

— Jme (Jamie Adenuga) (@JmeBBK) January 16, 2013

Heard a massive bang, major fire on Wandsworth Rd, police, fire brigade everywhere.Roads closed #Vauxhall#NineElmstwitter.com/ColinDKavanagh…

— Colin Kavanagh (@ColinDKavanagh) January 16, 2013

#vauxhall#helicopter RT @vctrjmnz: A helicopter crashed minutes ago on Wandsworth road twitter.com/vctrjmnz/statu…

— Lawrence (@leisuresuitlawl) January 16, 2013

2 dead in #helicopter crash in #Vauxhall, South London - latest update .. m.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-englan…twitter.com/ADELiCi0US/sta…

— Adelyn xo (@ADELiCi0US) January 16, 2013

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Society

The Queen’s Death Is The Perfect Time To Talk About What's Wrong With The Monarchy

Not everyone in Britain is mourning the death of the Queen. There is increasing concern about how the monarch's death is being used to repress freedom of expression and protest.

Queen Elizabeth II's coffin being carried during a Ceremonial Procession in London on Sept. 14

The main thing I remember from Princess Diana’s funeral is how fast the hearse drove.

I was 11, perched on a relative’s shoulders to see over the crowd, expecting the arrival of a solemn procession. But this was the M1 motorway, heading out of London, 100 kilometers still to reach Althorp, Diana’s final resting place. So the motorcade was going full speed — and I only caught a glimpse.

But I also remember all the people lining the M1, and cars stopped on the opposite side of the motorway. The country — and yes, the world — literally came to a standstill. More than 31 million people in the UK watched the Westminster Abbey funeral on television (1 in every 2 people), and an estimated 2.5 billion worldwide.

Fast-forward 25 years. Following British media from afar, you’d be forgiven for thinking the same outpouring of grief is happening for Queen Elizabeth II. Yes, more than a million people have queued up for miles to see the Queen lying in state. Yet despite blanket media coverage, public sentiment is not as universal, this time around.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ