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Although conventional warfare makes headlines, a more insidious conflict also warrants attention. Cyber warfare, in its many forms, is arguably still in its infancy. But the new-age combat is a growing concern — so much so that the latest NATO summit in Warsaw, Poland, chose to focus on cyber defense.


The list of government agencies, companies and even news organizations targeted by hackers gets longer everyday. Today is no exception: The Australian reports that DCNS, a submarine company mostly owned by the French government, suffered a massive leak that exposed in detail the ­entire secret combat capability of its Scorpene submarines.


This has enormous implications, not least in Asia. DCNS built a fleet of these submarines for India, meaning it would be an "intelligence bonanza" for rivals like Pakistan and China to obtain the 22,400 pages of leaked documents, the newspaper reports. Other countries that use similar submarines, from Malaysia to Chile, could also be affected. Reuters cited a DCNS spokeswoman as calling the hack "tools in an economic war" even as she said the information had yet to be authenticated.


This is not the only breach to be reported this week. In Russia, the Moscow bureau of The New York Times said it had been targeted, though unsuccessfully, by hackers. The announcement came days after hacking tools were apparently stolen from the U.S. National Security Agency in what whistleblower Edward Snowden said might be a "warning." Technology has, undeniably, brought us great benefits. But the truth is, we're all much more vulnerable as a result. These hacks are just the beginning.



WHAT TO LOOK FOR TODAY



EARTHQUAKE ROILS ITALY

A 6.2-magnitude earthquake killed at least 37 people and left 150 others missing after it struck about 65 miles northeast of Rome earlier today. "Half of the town isn't there anymore," Sergio Pirozzi, the mayor of Amatrice, told Italian daily Il Messaggero. Follow live updates from BBC.


FRENCHMAN KILLS WOMAN IN AUSTRALIA SHOUTING "ALLAHU AKBAR"

The 29-year-old Frenchman stabbed to death a British woman, 21, while apparently shouting the Arabic phrase for "God is great" at a backpackers' hostel in Australia's northeastern state of Queensland yesterday. A man was also seriously injured and a dog was killed in the attack. Australian police are investigating whether the killer, who has since been taken in custody, has any links to terrorist groups.


— ON THIS DAY

From the printing of the Gutenberg Bible to Stephen Fry, here's your 57-second shot of History.


TURKEY SENDS TANKS INTO SYRIA

The move is an effort to remove terror group ISIS from the Syrian border town of Jarablus, Al Jazeera reports. Turkey and the U.S.-led coalition have also been carrying out artillery and airstrikes in the area.


315 MILES

Elon Musk unveiled a new battery that extends Tesla's Model S range to 315 miles, the first time an electric car exceeded 300 miles of range. It will also make the sedan the world's fastest production car, going from 0 to 60 mph in just 2.5 seconds, Bloomberg reports.


— WORLDCRUNCH-TO-GO

Capital flows in Latin America suggest Brazil's economic free fall may have stopped. For America Economia, Marío Epstein writes: "Brazil's economy shrank 4% in 2015. A similar negative figure is expected this year. In keeping with cyclical theories, things are likely to bottom out soon. Analysts predict that its growth rate could stabilize in the third quarter of 2017 and gain momentum in the fourth. Nothing to celebrate, perhaps, but it will at least signal a turning point for producers and consumers to regain confidence."

Read the full article, Can Latin America's Economy Rebound? Keep An Eye On Brazil


NORTH KOREA FIRES MISSILE

South Korean news agency Yonhap reports that North Korea test-fired a ballistic missile from a submarine early this morning, in what South Korean officials described as an "apparent protest" of the annual military drills between Seoul and Washington.


— MY GRAND-PERE'S WORLD

Wish Upon A Line — Colombo, 1992


BRAIN SCANS SHOW EXTENT OF ZIKA EFFECTS

A study published in the journal Radiology suggests that the damage caused by Zika infection during pregnancy on the brains of fetuses could go beyond microcephaly. The study, led by neurologists in Boston and doctors in northeastern Brazil, says that babies born with a normal-size head may present serious brain abnormalities as they grow up.


MORE STORIES, BROUGHT TO YOU ENGLISH BY WORLDCRUNCH

CHILL GUARD

Nils Olav has been promoted to the rank of brigadier by the King of Norway's Guard. Oh, small detail: Nils is a penguin at Edinburgh Zoo.

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Geopolitics

Why The 'Perfect Storm' Of Iran's Protests May Be Unstoppable

The latest round of anti-regime protests in Iran is different than other in the 40 years of the Islamic Republic: for its universality and boldness, the level of public fury and grief, and the role of women and social media. The target is not some policy or the economy, but the regime itself.

A woman holds a lock of her hair during a London rally to protest the murder of Mahsa Amini in London

Roshanak Astaraki

-Analysis-

The death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in Tehran on Sept. 16, after a possible beating at a police station, has sparked outrage and mass protests in Iran and abroad. There have been demonstrations and a violent attempt to suppress them in more than 100 districts in every province of Iran.

These protests may look like others since 2017, and back even to 1999 — yet we may be facing an unprecedented turning point in Iranians' opposition to the Islamic Republic. Indeed newly installed conservative President Ibrahim Raisi could not have expected such momentum when he set off for a quick trip to New York and back for a meeting of the UN General Assembly.

For one of the mistakes of a regime that takes pride in dismissing the national traditions of Iran is to have overlooked the power of grief among our people.

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