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Gendercide: Aborting Female Fetuses Occurs In Europe Too

Gendercide: Aborting Female Fetuses Occurs In Europe Too

Abort until a son is born.

Having a girl is bad news in China and India, where female fetuses are too often aborted on purpose. But, according to a new German documentary, even Europe is not free of the horrid practice sometimes called "gendercide."

Die Welt reports that the documentary entitled So Long As It's A Boy, broadcast last week on the German-language Central European 3sat network, reveals stories of the willful abortion of female fetuses around the world, including Albania, Armenia and even in Indian communities within the UK.

There already is a worldwide deficit of 160 million women, but it will be years before the consequences of the continued practice are felt. Millions of men will not be able to find wives.

China and India spring to mind when contemplating the phenomenon, note reporters Birgit Wuthe und Magdalena Schüssler, but according to the report, the third-highest rate of gendercide in the world is actually much closer to us: Albania. High numbers of abortions of female fetuses in this country may be explained by the trend towards smaller families and the weight of tradition: Ideally, a couple in Albania has two children, and one of them is male, writes Die Welt.

Monda, an Albanian woman, reveals in the broadcast that she has already had three abortions, because they would have been girls. Her husband started beating her when she failed to give him sons, and because women are still financially dependent on their husbands, she couldn't flee.

In Armenia, "gendercide" has been publicly recognized as a problem. The country is trying to avoid abortions of female fetuses by providing state subsidies to families with daughters.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

A Decisive Spring? How Ukraine Plans To Beat Back Putin's Coming Offensive

The next months will be decisive in the war between Moscow and Kyiv. From the forests of Polesia to Chernihiv and the Black Sea, Ukraine is looking to protect the areas that may soon be the theater of Moscow's announced offensive. Will this be the last Russian Spring?

Photo of three ​Ukrainian soldiers in trenches near Bakhmut, Ukraine

Ukrainian soldiers in trenches near Bakhmut, Ukraine

Anna Akage

Ukrainian forces are digging new fortifications and preparing battle plans along the entire frontline as spring, and a probable new Russian advance, nears.

But this may be the last spring for occupying Russian forces.

"Spring and early summer will be decisive in the war. If the great Russian offensive planned for this time fails, it will be the downfall of Russia and Putin," said Vadym Skibitsky, the deputy head of Ukrainian military intelligence.

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Skinitysky added that Ukraine believes Russia is planning a new offensive in the spring or early summer. The Institute for the Study of War thinks that such an offensive is more likely to come from the occupied territories of Luhansk and Donetsk than from Belarus, as some have feared.

Still, the possibility of an attack by Belarus should not be dismissed entirely — all the more so because, in recent weeks, a flurry of MiG fighter jet activity in Belarusian airspace has prompted a number of air raid alarms throughout Ukraine.

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