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Defying doomsday predictions about traditional journalism, the UK on Monday welcomed its first standalone national print newspaper in 30 years.

The newspaper will trial at 25p ($0.35) for two weeks before the price is raised to 50p ($0.70). Its publishing company Trinity Mirror, whose flagship paper is the tabloid Daily Mirror, hopes the new title may find a particular readership among women. The New Day"s editor Alison Phillips said: "There are many people who aren't currently buying a newspaper, not because they have fallen out of love with newspapers as a format, but because what is currently available on the newsstand is not meeting their needs."

The front page of Monday's first edition of The New Day features the picture of a little boy alongside the headline "Stolen childhood," teasing an in-depth report about the pressures being placed on young children to help take care of fellow family members.

The first edition also features a piece penned by British Prime Minister David Cameron, in which he warns that the country faced a "decade of uncertainty" if it decided to leave the EU.

The new daily sees the light of day despite a sharp decline in sales across the industry, with readers switching to news websites and social media. Another well-regarded British daily, TheIndependent, recently announced it would run its last print edition on March 20.

Across the Atlantic, meanwhile, old-school daily journalism got some glitzy recognition Sunday night when the movie Spotlight, which chronicles the Boston Globe"s Pulitzer-Prize winning investigative report into priest sex abuse, won the Academy Award for Best Picture.

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Ideas

A Brief History Of Patriarchy — And How To Topple It

Many people assume the patriarchy has always been there, but how did it really originate? History shows us that there can be another way.

Women protest on International Women's Day in London in 2022

Ruth Mace*

The patriarchy, having been somewhat in retreat in parts of the world, is back in our faces. In Afghanistan, the Taliban once again prowl the streets more concerned with keeping women at home and in strict dress code than with the impending collapse of the country into famine.

And on another continent, parts of the U.S. are legislating to ensure that women can no longer have a legal abortion. In both cases, lurking patriarchal beliefs were allowed to reemerge when political leadership failed. We have an eerie feeling of travelling back through time. But how long has patriarchy dominated our societies?

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