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Extra! Sweet But Inconclusive Victory For Mariano Rajoy

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La Voz de Galicia, June 27th

The Monday edition of Spanish daily La Voz de Galiciafeatures a victorious Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy kissing his wife, Elvira Fernandes, after winning the most seats in Spain"s parliamentary elections.

Sunday's vote followed an inconclusive election in December, when the parties failed to agree on a coalition. Rajoy's conservative People's Party (PP) won at least 137 lower house seats, up from 123 seats in December.

"Rajoy Wins," read the headline in La Voz de Galicia, a daily in Spain's northwest, but again the incumbent prime minister is still well short of the 176 seats needed for an outright majority, and will need to form a government. The Socialists won 85, while anti-austerity party Podemos disappointed with only 71 seats. Pro-market party Ciudadanos, finished fourth as it did in December with 32 seats.

Amid Brexit turmoil, voters seemed to have backed away from insurgent political forces in favor of the relative security of the PP.

"We have won the elections — we claim the right to govern," Rajoy told the crowd. "Now it's about being useful to 100 percent of the Spanish people."

Talks with other parties will start soon, says Rajoy, as he tries to turn his election victory into a governing majority. But other parties have been reluctant to back the PP, in the face of corruption scandals and anger over high unemployment and the steep public spending cuts it has put in place.

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