When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

[rebelmouse-image 27089045 alt="""" original_size="750x958" expand=1]

La Razon, May 25, 2015

"Instability," reads the Monday headline of conservative Madrid daily La Razon, after the strong showing of two upstart parties in Spain's local and regional elections threatened the longstanding two-party duel between the Popular and Socialist parties.

The conservative Popular party of Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy suffered its worst local results in a generation, losing some of its support in Sunday's voting to the new center-right Ciudadanos party. The Popular party paid the price both for its economic austerity measures and for ongoing corruption scandals.

The biggest breakthrough was for the year-old left-leaning Podemos party, which sprang from 2011's popular "Los Indignados" movement that denounced economic policies as serving the wealthy few.

Ada Colau, an anti-poverty activist backed by Podemos, was elected mayor of Barcelona. The city's leading daily La Vanguardia characterized Colau's election as "Radical Change," an overall shift to the left across the country.

In the capital, 71-year-old former judge Manuela Carmena and her coalition Ahora Madrid, also backed by Podemos, scored surprisingly well, and could enter Madrid's city hall if it can pull together a coalition majority.

Nationwide, the landscape is indeed unstable and unclear after 40 years of the Popular and Socialist parties battling head-to-head following the end of the dictatorship in the early 1970s. Political leaders in a majority of regions will have to form coalitions for the first time to form a ruling majority.

Meanwhile, Rajoy, whose party lost 10% of the support it garnered in the previous vote, faces an uphill battle to win a second term in national elections slated later this year.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: La Razon is a conservative daily newspaper based in Madrid with local editions in many other Spanish cities, including Barcelona or Seville.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Dottoré!

Sowing The Seeds Of Paranoia

"They must be dumping garbage — good, it makes for good fertilizer!"

"Slowly, we were the only ones left"

Mariateresa Fichele

"Dottoré, I know a lot of flags, and let me tell you why. I grew up in the province of Caserta, and — like everybody in those days — my parents owned a piece of land, and they would take me with them to farm it.

I remember there were other kids in the fields around us. But then, slowly, we were the only ones left because everybody was selling the land, making a lot of money off of it too.

Papà wouldn't listen to reason and he kept the land. But in the meantime, instead of farmers, trucks began to arrive. Many many trucks, unloading thousands of barrels and burying them into the ground.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ