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Extra! Shanghai Disneyland Grand Opening

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Dongfang Zaobao, June 16

Chinese daily Dongfang Zaobao featured the grand opening of Shanghai Disneyland on its front page Thursday after the theme park dynasty opened its doors at midnight following five years of construction.

The $5.5 billion Shanghai Disney Resort is the American company's biggest theme park outside of the U.S. Some 10,000 employees were working on opening day on the site that covers nearly 1,000 acres of land. Meanwhile, Disney is expecting to serve 700 kilograms of rice every day. More "monster figures" here.

The opening ceremony started with speeches by Communist Party leaders, as Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang joined Disney chief executive Bob Iger in cutting a red ribbon and read out letters of congratulations from the Chinese and U.S. presidents, Xi Jinping and Barack Obama.

There were also a variety of musical features, including a performance by a children's choir and a custom arrangement of "Let it Go" by superstar Chinese-born pianist Lang Lang.

After more than a decade of negotiations, the arrival of the American entertainment conglomerate challenges many Chinese working in the theme park business. More on that here.

Analysts expect the Shanhai Disney to become the world's most-visited theme park, attracting as many as 50 million guests a year. By contrast, Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida drew 19.3 million people in 2014.

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Green Or Gone

Tracking The Asian Fishing "Armada" That Sucks Up Tons Of Seafood Off Argentina's Coast

A brightly-lit flotilla of fishing ships has reappeared in international waters off the southern coast of Argentina as it has annually in recent years for an "industrial harvest" of thousands of tons of fish and shellfish.

Photo of dozens of crab traps

An estimated 500 boats gather annually off the coast of Patagonia

Claudio Andrade

BUENOS AIRES — The 'floating city' of industrial fishing boats has returned, lighting up a long stretch of the South Pacific.

Recently visible off the coast of southern Argentina, aerial photographs showed the well-lit armada of some 500 vessels, parked 201 miles offshore from Comodoro Rivadavia in the province of Chubut. The fleet had arrived for its vast seasonal haul of sea 'products,' confirming its annual return to harvest squid, cod and shellfish on a scale that activists have called an environmental blitzkrieg.

In principle the ships are fishing just outside Argentina's exclusive Economic Zone, though it's widely known that this kind of apparent "industrial harvest" does not respect the territorial line, entering Argentine waters for one reason or another.

For some years now, activists and organizations like Greenpeace have repeatedly denounced industrial-style fishing as exhausting marine resources worldwide and badly affecting regional fauna, even if the fishing outfits technically manage to evade any crackdown by staying in or near international waters.

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