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Marianne

"Scandals, lawsuits, and bankers chase him. What of it!" writes French news weekly Marianne in its cover story this week.

"Nicolas Sarkozy has but one goal: take back ultimate power on the "Republican" ticket."

The former president of France has rattled observers across the political spectrum with his initiative to rebrand his center-right party, the UMP, the "Republicans". The name-change was approved in a party assembly last weekend.

The French frequently refer to their country as simply "the Republic," and to be "Republican" usually means to exemplify French values. Marianne calls the move a "hold-up" on the French political system.

But the magazine also notes the hurdles Sarkozy faces in his bid to win back the presidency in 2017, from the allegations of corruption and abuse of power in his inner circle to the centrist challengers for the party's nomination.

Some have speculated that the name-change was less about PR to sway voters than a way to solidify his authority within the party. With the creation of the Republicans, Sarkozy enjoys the advantage of being both the founder and only chief.

The former president's push to reclaim power has been anything but subtle -- and neither has the coverage by Marianne, a longtime opponent of Sarkozy. When he launched his comeback in September, Marianne mocked the move as a veritable horror fim, "Sarko II: The Return."

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Geopolitics

The Paradox Of Putin's War: Europe Is Going To Get Bigger, And Move Eastward

The European Union accelerated Ukraine's bid to join the Union. But there are growing signs, it won't stop there.

European Parliament in Strasbourg

Valon Murtezaj

-Analysis-

PARIS — Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine has upended the European order as we know it, and that was even before the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline was cut off earlier this month. While the bloc gets down to grappling with the unfolding energy crisis, the question of consolidating its flanks by speeding up the enlargement process has also come back into focus.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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In a critical meeting on June 23-24, the European Сouncil granted candidate status to Ukraine and Moldova and recognized the “European perspective” of Georgia – a nod acknowledging the country’s future belonged within the European Union.

Less than a month later, Brussels brought to an end the respectively 8- and 17-year-long waits for Albania and North Macedonia by allowing them into the foray of accession negotiations.

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