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Le Quotidien de la Réunion, July 31, 2015

"The probe zeroes in," reads Friday's front-page of the French newspaper Le Quotidien de la Réunion after a piece of plane debris was found on the French island in the Indian Ocean that may be from the missing MH370 flight that disappeared 16 months ago.

France's air crash investigation agency said it was examining the debris, found washed up Wednesday on a Western beach of the Réunion island. Malaysian and Australian authorities have also joined the probe. The piece of debris, which is about 2 to 2.5 meters long, may be a moving wing surface known as a flaperon.

"It is almost certain that the flaperon is from a Boeing 777 aircraft," Malaysian Deputy Transport Minister Abdul Aziz Kaprawi told Reuters.

The Boeing 777 carrying 239 passengers and crew disappeared without a trace on March 8, 2014, while on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Most of the passengers were Chinese. MH370 is believed to be the only 777 to have crashed south of the equator since the jet came into service 20 years ago.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: Le Quotidien de la Réunion covers news on the French island and in the Indian Ocean. It was founded in 1976.

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Geopolitics

The New Iraq, Signs Of Hope Amid The Rubble And Reconstruction

How do you rebuild a country decimated by four decades of war and embargoes? Following the withdrawal of the U.S. military, Iraq faces many challenges, from oil revenues captured by the militias and endemic corruption to religious segregation. However, there are glimmers of hope for the country's future.

Street scene in Erbil, Iraq

Théophile Simon

BAGHDAD — With a vast office located at the top of a tower fiercely guarded by the army and a bell to call the staff, Khalid Hamza Abbas is obviously a powerful character, decked out in an impeccable suit. Abbas runs the Basra Oil Company (BOC), the national company responsible for the exploitation of the oil fields in the province of Basra, in the very south of Iraq, from which four million barrels of crude oil flow daily. It’s the equivalent of 4% of world demand and 65% of central government revenue concentrated in a region of only four million inhabitants.

As he explains the profit-sharing scheme between the world’s major oil companies and his public enterprise, the 50-year-old with thin glasses is suddenly stopped dead in his tracks by the ringing of his telephone. He tries a joke to mask his suddenly worried face: "I'm going to ask you to leave my office for a few moments. If I haven't called you back in 10 minutes, call the police."

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