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Extra! MH370 Possible Crash Debris, Local Coverage

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Le Quotidien de la Réunion, July 31, 2015

"The probe zeroes in," reads Friday's front-page of the French newspaper Le Quotidien de la Réunion after a piece of plane debris was found on the French island in the Indian Ocean that may be from the missing MH370 flight that disappeared 16 months ago.

France's air crash investigation agency said it was examining the debris, found washed up Wednesday on a Western beach of the Réunion island. Malaysian and Australian authorities have also joined the probe. The piece of debris, which is about 2 to 2.5 meters long, may be a moving wing surface known as a flaperon.

"It is almost certain that the flaperon is from a Boeing 777 aircraft," Malaysian Deputy Transport Minister Abdul Aziz Kaprawi told Reuters.

The Boeing 777 carrying 239 passengers and crew disappeared without a trace on March 8, 2014, while on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Most of the passengers were Chinese. MH370 is believed to be the only 777 to have crashed south of the equator since the jet came into service 20 years ago.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: Le Quotidien de la Réunion covers news on the French island and in the Indian Ocean. It was founded in 1976.

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Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

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