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El Nacional, September 2

"Massive, without fear and in peace" reads Friday morning's front-page headline of Venezuelan daily El Nacional, after one of the largest protests to date against President Nicolas Maduro's reign.

Tens of thousands of chanting protesters marched Thursday through the streets of Caracas demanding a vote on recalling Maduro.

In recent years, hunger and shortages have grown as the economy of this oil-rich country has sharply contracted, undermining the popularity of Maduro, who was elected in 2013 after the death of Hugo Chavez.

According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, in the days leading up to the protest, the government arrested several prominent opposition activists, and barred at least six foreign journalists from entering the country. Fearing violence, downtown shops were closed, and police in yellow vests took up positions around the city during the march. Still the rally turned out to be largely peaceful.

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How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

American and Southwest Airlines have been refusing to allow Cubans on board flights if they've been blacklisted by the government in Havana.

How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

Boarding a plane in Camaguey, Cuba

Santiago Villa

On Sunday, American Airlines refused to let Cuban writer Carlos Manuel Álvarez board a Miami flight bound for Havana. It was at least the third time this year that a U.S. airline refused to let Cubans on board to return to their homeland after Havana circulated a government "blacklist" of critics of the regime. Clearly undemocratic and possibly illegal under U.S. law, the airlines want to make sure to cash in on a lucrative travel route, writes Colombian journalist Santiago Villa:

-OpEd-

Imagine for a moment that you left your home country years ago because you couldn't properly pursue your chosen career there. It wasn't easy, of course: Your profession is not just singularly demanding, but even at the top of the game you might not be assured a stable or sufficient income, and you've had to take on second jobs, working in bars and restaurants.

This chosen vocation is that of a writer or journalist, or perhaps an artist, which has kept you tied to your homeland, often the subject of your work, even if you don't live there anymore.

Since leaving, you've been back home several times, though not so much for work. Because if you did, you would be followed in cars and receive phone calls to let you know you are being watched.

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