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Extra! La Prensa: Pope In Bolivian Arms

"Pope Francis in Bolivia's arms," reads the front page of today's edition of Bolivian newspaper La Prensa. After three days in Ecuador, the Pope arrives in Bolivia, where he will stay until Friday.

In his homily in Quito on Tuesday, Francis called for an end to repression in the region — and La Prensa"s writes that to coincide with the papal visit, the Bolivian parliament passed a law granting amnesty to prisoners of conscience.

Francis will spend most of Wednesday in the Bolivian capital of La Paz, where he will meet President Evo Morales. Later in the day, he will leave for Santa Cruz, the country's second-largest city, where he will spend the rest of his short stay.

Recent reports in the Bolivian and international media have speculated over whether the Pope will chew coca leaves while he is in the countryside. Coca leaves, which are the main ingredient in cocaine, are widely used in Bolivia to combat altitude sickness, often chewed or brewed as tea. Two of his predecessors engaged in the local custom, and Bolivia's culture minister has invited Francis to do the same.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: La Prensa is a Bolivian daily published in La Paz.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Saturate The East! Poland Revamps Its Military Strategy In Response To Russian Threat

Poland has a border with Russia and Belarus, so it is not just watching how the Ukraine war develops. Warsaw is rethinking its entire defense strategy.

Photo of a Polish soldier seen working at the construction of the fence along the border with the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad.

Wisztyniec, Poland. A Polish soldier seen working at the construction of the fence along the border with the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad.

Attila Husejnow / SOPA Images via ZUMA Press Wire
Stanislav Zhelikhovsky

KYIV — It will soon be exactly one year since the Russian Federation launched its large-scale invasion of Ukraine. During that time, neighboring Poland has been playing the role of a front-line country — NATO's eastern outpost.

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Polish government agencies have been hard at work on what to do if the country is attacked. In particular, a new defense directive. After all, Poland’s Political and Strategic Defense Directive, which has been in effect since 2018, must be updated because it simply doesn't match today's reality.

Poland's Deputy Minister of National Defense, Wojciech Skurkiewicz, announced a change in defense doctrine with the defense forces set up on the Vistula River, located in northeastern Poland. Ukraine's experience shows the need to protect the country's entire territory as quickly as possible.

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