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Extra! L'Obs On Islam's Competing Branches

After centuries of disagreements over the legacy of the Prophet Muhammad, the split between Islam's two main schools of thought is more apparent than ever, as the two theocratic regimes of the Middle East are increasingly hostile towards each other.

"Shias, Sunnis: Why is Islam torn apart?" the French newsweekly L'Obs writes on Friday's cover. "From Muhammad's death to the the rise of ISIS, centuries-old conflicts explained."

As the publications notes, Sunnis represent around 85% of the world's Muslim community and the Shias close to 15%.The Houthi rebellion in Yemen is being fought by a coalition led by Saudi Arabia but allegedly supported by the Iranians as the two countries fight for influence in the region.

The divide between the two branches of Islam is as much a major talking point among Muslims as others, as ISIS is murdering hoardes of Muslims affiliated with Shia in territories it has conquered.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: L'OBS is a left-leaning French weekly newsmagazine based in Paris.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

And If It Had Been Zelensky? How The War Became Bigger Than Any One Person

Ukraine’s Minister of Internal Affairs Denys Monastyrsky was killed Wednesday in a helicopter crash. The cause is still unknown, but the high-profile victim could just have well been President Zelensky instead. It raises the question of whether there are indispensable figures on either side in a war of this nature?

Photo of ​Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky looking down in a cemetery in Lviv on Jan. 11

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in Lviv on Jan. 11

Anna Akage

-Analysis-

The news came at 8 a.m., local time: a helicopter had crashed in Brovary, near Kyiv, with all the top management of Ukraine's Ministry of Internal Affairs on board, including Interior Minister Denys Monastyrsky. There were no survivors.

Having come just days after a Russian missile killed dozens in a Dnipro apartment, the first thought of most Ukrainians was about the senseless loss of innocent life in this brutal war inflicted on Ukraine. Indeed, it occurred near a kindergarten and at least one of the dozens killed was a small child.

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But there was also another kind of reaction to this tragedy, since the victims this time included the country's top official for domestic security. For Ukrainians (and others) have been wondering — regardless of whether or not the crash was an accident — if instead of Interior Minister Monastyrsky, it had been President Volodymyr Zelensky in that helicopter. What then?

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