[rebelmouse-image 27089099 alt="""" original_size="750x1219" expand=1]

South China Morning Post, June 5, 2015

Tens of thousands of people held a candlelight vigil Thursday night in Hong Kong's Victoria Park to mark the 26th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, the student-led demonstrations in which hundreds — thousands, according to some estimates — are believed to have died.

The Hong Kong-based, English-language newspaper South China Morning Post is one of the rare Chinese publications to make a mention of the gathering, running a picture on its front page. The Tiananmen massacre is still widely subjected to censorship from the Chinese government. According to the BBC, several activists in mainland China have been put under house arrest to prevent them from participating in the commemoration.

The special administrative region is actually the only location on Chinese soil to hold a significant commemoration. This year's gathering took special meaning after last year's "Umbrella Revolution" in Hong Kong.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: The South China Morning Post is an English-language newspaper with a circulation of 104,000, published by the SCMP Group. It was founded in 1903 and is based Hong Kong.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Support Worldcrunch
We are grateful for reader support to continue our unique mission of delivering in English the best international journalism, regardless of language or geography. Click here to contribute whatever you can. Merci!
Society

Teachers v. Parents: The End Of Tunisia's "Golden Age" Of Education

Violence against teachers, poorly received educational reforms, conflicts with parents: In Tunisia, the entire education sector is in crisis.

In a Koranic school in Kasserine

Frida Dahmani

TUNIS — In Sousse, a city in eastern Tunisia, students tried to burn down their school with Molotov cocktails. In Mahdia, a coastal city, an English teacher was dragged before the courts after having given an F to a student. In Ezzahra, in the southern suburbs of Tunis, a student stabbed his history and geography teacher after not being allowed to retake an exam for which he had been absent without an excuse. Another student exhibited female underwear in class to make his classmates laugh.

Keep reading... Show less
Support Worldcrunch
We are grateful for reader support to continue our unique mission of delivering in English the best international journalism, regardless of language or geography. Click here to contribute whatever you can. Merci!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ