The latest issue of Charlie Hebdo published Wednesday, six weeks after the "Survivors' Issue" that followed the deadly attacks on its headquarters on Jan. 7. As the weekly resumes its regular publication rhythm with the headline "C'est reparti!" ("Here we go again!"), 2.5 million copies of the latest Charlie Hebdo number 1179 have been printed.

The cover was drawn by Luz, who also did the previous cover with the Prophet Muhammad in tears holding a sign that says" Je suis Charlie," along with the title "All is forgiven." Wednesday's cover shows a dog with a copy of the magazine in its mouth being chased by a pack of hounds representing the former President Nicolas Sarkozy, the head of the French National Front Marine Le Pen, a jihadist, the pope, a banker and the French television network BFM TV.

"People need to talk about Charlie"s return, to say Charlie is doing its work again, its work against stupidity, against the National Front," Luz told the French daily Libération, where the weekly's staff is still taking refuge.

"I'm glad we did something joyful," he added.

The weekly, which lost five of its top cartoonists in the attack of its headquarters that killed a total of 12, has hired two new talents: Algerian cartoonist Dilem, who has long been threatened by Islamic fundamentalists, and Pétillon, who draws for another French satirical weekle, Le Canard Enchaîné.

Charlie Hebdo used to be published at around 50,000 weekly copies. But the number of subscribers has multiplied after the Jan. 7 attacks, reaching 200,000.

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Why U.S. Vaccine Diplomacy In Latin America Makes "Good" Sense

Echoing its cultural diplomacy of the early 20th century, the United States is gifting vaccines to Latin America as part of a renewed "good neighbor'' policy.

Waiting to get the vaccine in Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico

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-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — Just before and during World War II, the United States' Good Neighbor policy proved a very effective strategy to improve ties with Latin America. Initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the policy's main goal was non-interference and non-intervention. The U.S. would instead focus on reciprocal exchanges with their southern neighbors, including through art and cultural diplomacy.

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