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Die Tageszeitung, March 17, 2015

Things are heating up between Germany and Greece, again. The news Monday that Germany's DAX index reached an all-time high — even as cash-strapped Athens is trying to scrape enough money to make a $2 billion debt payment on Friday — prompted the Berlin-based daily Tageszeitung to give Greece's radical-left Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis a taste of his own medicine, in retaliation to what the German media is calling the "Fingergate."

Tageszeitung"s headline "Europe gives Varoufakis the middle finger," with a hand drawn on a picture of the European Central Bank's headquarters in Frankfurt, is a tit-for-tat move against the new Greek finance minister after the emergence of a two-year-old video in which he suggested that the then government should file for bankruptcy and let Germany foot the bill, while flipping the bird to illustrate his comment.

When he was shown the footage Sunday on one of Germany's most popular talkshows on the state TV channel ARD, Varoufakis said he had "never given the finger ever" and that the video had been altered — though it was since confirmed as authentic.

This topped a difficult weekend for Varoufakis as the finance minister was also subjected to online mockery over a photo shoot with French magazine Paris Match, set in his luxurious home in the vicinity of Athens' Acropolis.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: Founded in 1978 in Berlin, Die Tageszeitung, also known as "taz," is a left-leaning newspaper famous for its tongue-in-cheek headlines.

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Society

Jehovah's Witnesses Translate The Bible In Indigenous Language — Is This Colonialism?

The Jehovah's Witnesses in Chile have launched a Bible version translated into the native Mapudungun language, evidently indifferent to the concerns of a nation striving to save its identity from the Western cultural juggernaut.

A Mapuche family awaits for Chilean President Gabriel Boric to arrive at the traditional Te Deum in the Cathedral of Santiago, on Chile's Independence Day.

Claudia Andrade

NEUQUÉN — The Bible can now be read in Mapuzugun, the language of the Mapuche, an ancestral nation living across Chile and Argentina. It took the Chilean branch of the Jehovah's Witnesses, a latter-day Protestant church often associated with door-to-door proselytizing and cold calling, three years to translate it into "21st-century Mapuzugun".

The church's Mapuche members in Chile welcomed the book when it was launched in Santiago last June, but some of their brethren see it rather as a cultural imposition. The Mapuche were historically a fighting nation, and fiercely resisted both the Spanish conquerors and subsequent waves of European settlers. They are still fighting for land rights in Chile.

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