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Die Welt, June 9, 2015

"G7 agrees to ambitious climate goals," reads the front page of German daily Die Welt"s Tuesday edition.

The Group of Seven talks have ended in the German mountain resort of Garmisch-Partenkirchen with a photo op worthy of the Sound of Music (which was filmed in the nearby Austrian Alps).Â

The scenic surroundings blended well with the progress the Group made on climate change, a priority in light of the upcoming COP21 climate negotiations in Paris.  While no member countries committed to specific actions, the Group announced a goal of keeping overall climate warming from passing 2 degrees Celsius. The group also announced a long-term goal of eliminating fossil fuel emissions completely by the end of this century.Â

The conflict in Ukraine remained a major issue for the G7 — which was the G8 before expelling Russia over Putin's annexation of Crimea in 2014.  German Chancellor Angela Merkel announced that all seven members were committed to keeping sanctions on Russia in place until a ceasefire in eastern Ukraine is reached. Â

ABOUT THE SOURCE:Â Die Welt ("The World")Â is a German daily founded in Hamburg in 1946, and currently owned by the Axel Springer AG company, Europe's largest publishing house. Now based in Berlin, Die Welt is sold in more than 130 countries.

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