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Publico, Aug. 10

Forest fires burned into Wednesday on Portugal's Madeira Islands, killing at least three people, injuring 174 and forcing the evacuation of more than 1000 from homes and hotels. Several buildings were destroyed on the resort island, including reports of damage to a five-star hotel, as fires have now burned for two days.

Wednesday's front page headline of Portuguese daily Publico reads "Catastrophe in Madeira: Flames reach the heart of Funchal," noting that the blaze had touched the municipal capital of the island that sits off the coast of northwest Africa.

Authorities hope that cooler temperatures forecast for Wednesday can help bring the blaze under control. August is typically the peak time for wildfires in Portugal and other southern European countries, as high temperatures mix with strong winds. Portuguese officials say fires are often started deliberately and spread quickly because forests are not cleared of dead wood.

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