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Libération, July 21, 2015

What is being hailed as the world's first known case of long-term remission from HIV, in an 18-year-old French woman born with the virus, is featured in today's Paris-based newspaper Libération with the headline, "Curing HIV."

The girl, who was born in 1996, contracted the virus that causes AIDS from her mother and was given four anti-retroviral drugs when she was three months old. For reasons that have not been made public, her family decided to stop the treatment when she was six.

But when she was tested again a year later, she had undetectable levels of HIV in her blood. Today, her HIV level is still below standards and she is healthy despite not taking any drugs. No scientific reasons for that have been found for the moment.

This could be the first long-term remission case in the world. In 2013 a Mississippi baby born with HIV had no detectable virus in her blood for 18 months, though the virus subsequently returned.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: Libération is a leading left-wing daily French newspaper based in Paris.

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