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SPOTLIGHT: EXPLOSIONS IN THAILAND, QUESTIONS OF LABEL

Thailand was hit by a series of coordinated blasts across the country last night and early this morning, leaving four people dead and 34 injured. The Bangkok Post reports that the heaviest damage was in the resort town of Hua Hin, where explosions killed two and injured dozens, including foreign tourists. The popular island of Phuket was also targeted in the string of attacks that struck at least five cities on a public holiday marking the queen's birthday.


Tensions were running high in Thailand after last weekend's vote on a new constitution and in the run up to the anniversary of a bombing that killed 22 people in Bangkok last year. "The bombs are an attempt to create chaos and confusion," said Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha.


What is unclear is who was behind the explosions. "It's too soon to jump to any conclusion," deputy police spokesman Poll Col Krisana Pattanacharoen was quoted as saying by the newspaper. "But what we know for sure is that the incidents are not linked directly to any kinds of terrorism, in fact it's local sabotage and we are trying to identify those responsible behind the scenes."


As we get endless news of attacks from different corners of the world, it's worth taking a step back before jumping to labels of any kind — especially when the motive remains unknown. An article by Süddeutsche Zeitung's Joachim Käppner, translated exclusively into English by Worldcrunch, says that societies often dismiss bombers and terrorists as "insane" and "crazy" but argues that these labels hide an uncomfortable truth: According to forensic experts cited by Käppner, pathologizing such crimes only blurs the culprit's responsibility and stigmatizes those who are truly mentally ill.



WHAT TO LOOK FOR TODAY (& WEEKEND)

  • International Youth Day focuses on poverty eradication and sustainable consumption.
  • World Alternative Games open in Wales. They include bog snorkelling, wife carrying, husband dragging, gravy wrestling, Russian egg roulette, backward running and worm charming.
  • Fidel Castro turns 90 on Saturday.


TENSIONS RISE BETWEEN RUSSIA AND UKRAINE

Russian president Vladimir Putin announced counter-terrorism measures and naval training exercises in the Black Sea, a day after he accused Ukraine of sending saboteurs to Crimea, which Moscow annexed in 2014. Ukraine, worried about Russia ramping up fighting in the war between Kiev and pro-Russia separatists, put all troops near Crimea and in eastern Ukraine on high alert, Reuters reports.


— MY GRAND-PERE'S WORLD

No Bumps In Translation — Reykjavik, 2001


400 YEARS

Scientists have discovered that Greenland sharks are the longest-living vertebrates known on earth. Their lifespan is believed to be at least 400 years, and they reach sexual maturity around the age of 150.


COLOMBIA AND VENEZUELA TO PARTIALLY REOPEN BORDER

Colombia and Venezuela have agreed to partially reopen the border between the two countries, almost a year after President Nicolas Maduro closed it on security grounds. El Espectadorreports that Maduro and Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos agreed on other bilateral measures including fighting transnational crime.


— ON THIS DAY

Happy birthday to the "Sultan of Swing," turning 67 today! That, and more, in your 57-second shot of History.


POLIO CASES IN NIGERIA

Two new cases of polio were reported today in Nigeria's northeastern state of Borno, marking the return of the disease to the country after two years of being polio-free. According to local daily Vanguard, Nigerian authorities will launch a drive to immunize 5 million children to prevent the virus from spreading.


MELTING TRUMP

Cuban illustrator Edel Rodriguez turned up the heat on Donald Trump in TIME magazine's latest issue. Check it out here.


PHELPS MATCHES ANCIENT GREECE'S LEONIDAS

American swimmer Michael Phelps shattered yet another Olympic record yesterday, winning his 12th individual medal and matching the tally of another famous Olympic athlete — albeit one from ancient Greece. Leonidas of Rhodes, a runner, had won 12 solo medals at four Games between 164 and 152 BC, possibly one of the world's oldest records.


MORE STORIES, EXCLUSIVELY IN ENGLISH BY WORLDCRUNCH

FIJI CELEBRATES FIRST OLYMPIC MEDAL

Fiji's rugby sevens team won a gold — a first for the South Pacific archipelago. Fiji Times reports that Aug. 22 was declared a public holiday to celebrate the team's victory. From the stands in Rio de Janeiro, Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama expressed hope that the country's "GDP would go up in the next couple of weeks" after days of "nil productivity" as citizens breathlessly followed their team's success.


STAR WARS STRIKES BACK

And obviously, stop everything you're doing, to watch the new trailer for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

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Society

Lionel To Lorenzo: Infecting My Son With The Beautiful Suffering Of Soccer Passion

This is the Argentine author's fourth world cup abroad, but his first as the father of two young boys.

photo of Lionel Messi saluting the crowd

Argentina's Lionel Messi celebrates the team's win against Australia at the World Cup in Qatar

Ignacio Pereyra

I love soccer. But that’s not the only reason why the World Cup fascinates me. There are so many stories that can be told through this spectacular, emotional, exaggerated sport event, which — like life and parenthood — is intense and full of contradictions.

This is the fourth World Cup that I’m watching away from my home country, Argentina. Every experience has been different but, at times, Qatar 2022 feels a lot like Japan-South Korea 2002, the first one I experienced from abroad, when I was 20 years old and living in Spain.

Now, two decades later, living in Greece as the father of two children, some of those memories are reemerging vividly.

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