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The two members of Electro Velvet, this year's Eurovision contestant for the United Kingdom, seem like fun people. Alex Larke for instance always wears odd socks, while Bianca Nicholas can do a pretty decent impression of Christina Aguilera. None of which will help them win the contest, but hey, at least they have something else going on in their lives, be it only odd socks.

A combination between 1920s jazz and modern beat, Electro Velvet's old-timey jam is called "Electro swing," a musical genre in the line of Dubstep-musette, Celtip hip hop, Lullabycore and Fusion waltz — all names we totally did not just make up.

Their song "Still In Love With You" is an upbeat track reminiscent of Parov Stellar or Caravan Palace, and is full of life-saving advice like "Well, don’t get on the wrong train, Don’t fly in an old plane, Don’t go out in the pouring rain, You might get wet I’d be upset." Duh.

Since its first participation in 1957, the UK has won the competition five times — most famously in 1967 with Sandie Shaw's song "Puppet on a String." So here's to hoping this year will see a "Puppet on a Swing"!

Our vote:

Does it make you want to visit that country? 7/10

Was there enough glitter? 7.25/10

Ok to quit your day job? 7/10

OVERALL AVERAGE: 7.08/10

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