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Having won five times, Sweden is one of the most successful countries in the Eurovision Song Contest. In 1974, a song about Napoleon's defeat meant victory for the first time for the Scandinavian nation. And three years ago, Loreen gave Sweden its fifth win with the song "Euphoria" — which did not exactly trigger the same euphoric career as ABBA for the singer.

This year's song, "Heroes" by 28-year-old Mans Zelmerlöw, was described as a mix between Avicii and Coldplay, with hints of David Guetta. So, basically, elevator music played really loud?

And lyrics like "Tell the others to go sing it like a hummingbird" and "I make worms turn into butterflies," make us wonder whether little Mans was paying any attention at all during biology class.

Or maybe he's just trying to be funny: When asked if he had a lucky routine before going on stage, Zelmerlöw replied, "Actually no, except from checking that my zipper's closed."

Is it all a joke to you, Mans? IS IT?

You can listen to the song below, but don't bother watching the video. It's one big blur that probably cost nothing to film.

Come on, Sweden, we're all in this together. It's like you're not even trying.

Our vote:

Does it make you want to visit that country? 0.25/10

Was there enough glitter? 3.75/10

Ok to quit your day job? 2.5/10

OVERALL AVERAGE: 2.17/10

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Dottoré!

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